Magnitude 4.8 Earthquake Hits Southern Kansas, No Injuries Reported So Far [Breaking]

Kansas earthquake

Citizens of southern Kansas were rattled by an earthquake earlier today, the tremors of which were felt all across the state and certain parts of Oklahoma. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the earthquake measured at magnitude 4.8. The epicenter of the earthquake is reported to be the town of Milan in Kansas. The exact location is said to be Conway Springs, 11 miles north of Milan. The quake happened at 21:40:00.60 UTC (3:40 p.m., CST) on Nov 12, 2014.

Kansas earthquake epicenter

The earthquake was shallow in nature and is believed to have happened 3.4 miles below the crust. There have been no reports of injuries or casualties following the earthquake, reports Reuters.

“We have not received any reports of injury or damage but we are still gathering information,” Sharon Watson, a spokeswoman for Kansas Emergency Management, told Yahoo!.

According to ABC News, people living near the epicenter of the earthquake reported feeling the earth shaking for 10 to 20 seconds. They were quick to add that the shaking was not intense. The ABC News report also adds that a fire truck had been dispatched to a location eight miles south of Conway Springs where officials suspect damage to a structure.

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Local media houses in Kansas are, however, reporting that there was some damage to structures owing to the fact that this quake was stronger than what is usually felt in this area. According to a KWCH 12 report, a few structures have received damage to their foundations. Other minor incidents include a propane tank that shifted off its foundation as well as the uprooting of a tree. This was confirmed by Summer County Emergency Manager, James Fair.

People in Oklahoma City, 125 miles south of the epicenter of this earthquake, also reported noticeable shaking when the earthquake hit. The U.S. Geological Survey has warned of several aftershocks that are likely to follow this earthquake.

[Image Via U.S. Geological Survey]