Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370: Emirates CEO, Sir Tim Clark, Believes ‘Control Was Taken Of’ Jet Before Disappearance

The ongoing mystery of what happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 when the jetliner inexplicably disappeared last March, along with its 239 passengers and crew, continues to be an enigma. However, Emirates CEO, the recently Knighted Sir Tim Clark, doesn’t want it to remain that way, doubting the official explanations and speculations of what happened to MH370.

While even the most recent official assumptions are that the Malaysia Airlines Flight simply ran out of fuel, crashed into the ocean, and sank to the bottom, Sir Tim Clark is expressing his belief that “control was taken of” MH370 before she disappeared, according to the Daily Mail.

Sir Tim Clark also made clear how important it is that the airline industry not simply accept the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 as just an “unexplained mystery”, and move on.

Emirates, which is Sir Tim Clark’s airline, has a fleet of nearly 130 Boeing 777 aircraft, similar to MH370, so making any final conclusion that MH370 “just vanished” is unacceptable.

The Emirates CEO made his opinions clear in an interview with Spiegel, a German magazine.

“MH370 remains one of the great aviation mysteries. Personally, I have the concern that we will treat it as such and move on. At the most, it might then make an appearance on National Geographic as one of aviation’s great mysteries. We mustn’t allow this to happen. We must know what caused that airplane to disappear… MH370 was, in my opinion, under control, probably until the very end… My own view is that probably control was taken of that airplane. It’s anybody’s guess who did what. We need to know who was on the plane in the detail that obviously some people do know. We need to know what was in the hold of the aircraft. And we need to continue to press all those who were involved in the analysis of what happened for more information… I do not subscribe to the view that the Boeing 777, which is one of the most advanced in the world and has the most advanced communication platforms, needs to be improved with the introduction of some kind of additional tracking system. MH370 should never have been allowed to enter a non-trackable situation.”

CNN aviation analyst Miles O’Brien gave further support to Sir Tim Clark’s notions, when he identified a compartment just outside the Boeing 777 cockpit that could potentially allow someone to take control of the plane if they knew what they were doing.

According to O’Brien, once someone accessed the hatch, which is usually unsecured — meaning unlocked — they could cause all kinds of problems, including setting off fail systems, yanking circuit breakers, tapping into MH370’s system, and ultimately taking over the plane.

O’Brien says that once plugged into a little terminal within the compartment, take over of a Boeing 777 like MH370 could’ve been complete if the commandeers knew what they were doing, and more frighteningly, at that point he describes Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 as basically being equivalent to a giant jet flying video game. He makes clear that this may not be what happened but it is certainly another possibility.

But even if MH370 was commandeered by an outside element, Sir Tim Clark is still baffled by the fact that no physical evidence of any kind has been found that points to where the Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 either landed or went down, pointing out that not so much as a “seat cushion” has ever been found.

“There hasn’t been one over water incident in the history of civil aviation, apart from Amelia Earhart in 1939, that has not been at least 5 or 10 percent trackable. But MH 370 has simply disappeared. For me, that raises a degree of suspicion. I’m totally dissatisfied with what has been coming out of all of this.”

Given the fact that Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 has been missing for over six months with zero physical evidence pointing to her ultimate destination or demise, hopefully Sir Tim Clark’s assertions will help lead to discovering MH370’s whereabouts and some closure for the MH370 families.

[Image via news.com.au]