Fox News Hosts Fuming Over Obama's Most Recent Jab

There are few networks that do outrage better than Fox News. And it seems as though President Obama's recent jab at the network has many of Fox's hosts up in arms.

While addressing students at Northwestern University, President Obama said the following.

"I have laid out my ideas to create more jobs and grow more wages. A true opposition party should have the courage to lay out theirs. There's a reason fewer Republicans are preaching doom on deficits—because the deficits have come down at almost a record pace, and they're now manageable. There's a reason fewer Republicans are running against Obamacare–because while good, affordable health care might seem like a fanged threat to the freedom of the American people on Fox News, it's working pretty well in the real world."

Obama also tweeted a very similar statement, saying, "While affordable health care might still be a threat to freedom on Fox News, it's working pretty well in the real world."

Various Fox News network hosts immediately took insult to the remarks.

Greta Van Susteren, who hosts the Fox News' show On the Record with Greta Van Susteren, said that Obama was not acting "presidential," needed to be "tougher," and should quit blaming Fox News for his problems. In fact, the lead-in to the clip reads "President Obama likes to play the blame game and blaming Fox News was red meat for his base. But he has to realize he doesn't hurt us and only diminishes his office."

Laura Ingraham, a conservative political commentator, complained on Fox News' popular show The O'Reilly Factor that Obama's jab at Fox's reporting on the Affordable Care Act was a "classic Alinskyite tactic" and that "liberalism, Obama-style, is failing."

Fox News host of The Five, Greg Gutfeld, also joined in his network's outrage, saying that the President "bashes FNC more than ISIS, and we don't behead anybody!"

Despite their outrage, however, fact checking of Fox News coverage on the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, shows that the network has been, at the very best, skewed in their reporting. Sean Hannity devoted an entire episode to what he called "Obamacare Horror Stories," only to be corrected in an article by Salon, whose author tracked down each person on the show. PunditFact, a site hosted by Politifact, finds that statements it rates from Fox News rate "true" or "mostly true" only 22 percent of the time, while 62 percent of their checked statements are rated from "mostly false" to the infamous "pants on fire" rating.

[Image via Washington Times]