Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders Is Building Momentum

Bernie Sanders could be on the verge of changing the tide of the Democratic primary race. As the Wisconsin state primary is just a couple of days away, Bernie Sanders seemingly has picked up where he left off. He is beginning to open up more eyes now, than when the primaries first began.

A potential Bernie Sanders win in the Wisconsin primary would give him more momentum going forward as he attempts to wrest away delegates from Hillary Clinton. Sanders has won six of the seven states. A Sanders’ victory over Clinton in Wisconsin would be huge for the Vermont senator.

According to MSNBC, Bernie Sanders is ahead in the polls with him out in front with 49 percent. Hillary Clinton is trailing with 43 percent. Thus far, however, many polls have been inaccurate. Then again, the majority of the polls had Clinton widely in front.

Will the polls have it correct this time?

Hillary Clinton hopes that the polls have it all wrong on Tuesday. She knows that winning the Wisconsin primary would widen her delegate lead, almost leaving Bernie Sanders hanging on by a thread.

There will be 96 delegates at stake. Of the 96 delegates, 10 are super delegates. The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel confirms that the winner of the Wisconsin primary will automatically be awarded 29 delegates. The remaining 57 represent each congressional district with whomever wins the district receiving the delegate.

How the Wisconsin delegates are divvied out, there could be a scenario where Bernie Sanders could win the primary, along with the majority of the congressional districts. He could conceivably have as many as 86 delegates, excluding all of the super delegates by the end of Tuesday.

That is an extreme case, but another, more realistic situation could loom.

For instance, if Sanders won 29 of the remaining available 57 delegates. That count of 29, along with delegates awarded for winning the Democratic primary, would give him 58 delegates.

If Bernie Sanders pulls out a win in Wisconsin, Hillary Clinton’s campaign might be in trouble. Sanders is on the verge of creating a true underdog story.

Most voters initially thought Bernie Sanders would not last as long as he has. His message of taking on Wall Street and the one percent is starting to gain traction, as is his plea to make public colleges tuition-free.

Bernie Sanders supporters
A group of Bernie Sanders’ supporters, young and older come out to cheer him on during a town hall meeting. [Photo by Scott Olsen/Getty Images]
The Iowa caucus showed the pollsters that many voters host a different viewpoint than those who were polled. Many of the tallies had Hillary Clinton way in front in the Iowa race. She barely got past Sanders in the first primary of the presidential season. As most states followed, Clinton won several key state races, including landslides in Texas, Florida and South Carolina. There were other states which were much closer.

Bernie Sanders’ campaign got a shot in the arm with victories in Oklahoma and Kansas. The improbable win in Michigan and a narrow defeats in Illinois and Missouri gave his presidential bid some additional hope.

Another reason he has some hope is that something unconventional is taking place.

Members of Bernie Sanders’ camp are expecting a high voter turnout in Wisconsin. When there is a high amount of voters who come out, Sanders does well.

People have come out to the town hall meetings and rallies. They have heard his messages, including when he talks about the war on drugs.

“I think we’ve got to take a hard look at the so-called war on drugs. In the last 30 years, many millions of Americans have received police records for possession of marijuana, for example.”

That rhetoric is an attempt to reach people across the board.

Sanders’ campaign is sweeping people off their feet, young and old. According to the Washington Post, his supporters in Wisconsin are a close representation of the voters who have come out in droves. They view him as the answer to the nation’s ills. One supporter went as far as saying she would write Bernie Sanders’ name in if he does not get the Democratic nomination. There is a strong feeling that she is not alone.

[Photo by Scott Olsen/Getty Images]

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