Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift Celebrates International Women’s Day, Asks Fans To Pledge For Parity

Taylor Swift is just one of the many celebrities who are celebrating the importance of women’s equality on International Women’s Day.

On Tuesday, March 8, the 26-year-old pop star took to Twitter to ask her fans to take a pledge for parity. Swift tweeted, “So grateful and inspired today. Take the Pledge for Parity.”

She also tweeted a photo, which read, “I pledge to help women and girls achieve their ambitions,” which is one of the pledge options.

Other options include to “challenge conscious and unconscious bias,” “call for gender-balanced equality,” “value women and men’s contributions equally,” and “create inclusive, flexible cultures.”

For those who don’t know, International Women’s Day is about women and men joining together to recognize and celebrate the cultural, economic, political, and social achievements of women. In plain English, it means that everyone should fight for women’s rights every day out of the year.

Swift has been outspoken about her feminist issues ever since her critically acclaimed album 1989 dropped in October 2014. She last made waves when she donated $250,000 to Kesha to help pay her legal fees in her ongoing battle with producer Dr. Luke.

“In show of support, Taylor Swift has donated $250,000 to Kesha to help with any of her financial needs during this trying time,” Swift’s rep told JustJared.

Taylor Swift also made headlines when she rightfully called out Kanye West and spoke for all women while accepting her Album of the Year award at the 2016 Grammys. The rapper’s new song, “Famous,” featured the misogynistic line, “I feel like me and Taylor might still have sex/Why? I made that b**ch famous.”

Taylor Swift
(Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

In her acceptance speech, Swift hit back without stooping to name dropping or perverse language.

“There are going to be people along the way who will try to undercut your success or take credit for your accomplishments or your fame. But… some day when you get where you’re going, you’ll look around and you will know that it was you and the people who love you who put you there and that will be the greatest feeling in the world.”

The singer-songwriter also became the first woman to win Album of the Year at the Grammys twice. That night, Swift also took home an award for Best Pop Vocal Album and Best Music Video for “Bad Blood,” which also features her famous girl squad. Swift also opened the 58th annual Grammy Awards with a first-ever live performance of “Out of the Woods.”

The international pop star has come a long way from the singer who was afraid to call herself a feminist because she didn’t want to alienate her country fans. But in her 2014 cover story with Rolling Stone, Taylor explained why she’s proud to identify as a feminist these days. To her, feminism means wanting to have the same opportunities as men.

When she topped Maxim’s Hot 100 list, she explained why she changed her thoughts on feminism. Swift explained that she didn’t understand feminism at a young age, which is understandable. She didn’t realize the double standards in the music industry until it happened to her. Swift gets slammed for writing songs about her relationships, while men continue to get praised for it.

“So to me, feminism is probably the most important movement that you could embrace, because it’s just basically another word for equality.”

Of course, sharing your views doesn’t go without some scrutiny from the media. Taylor has been slammed for being anti-feminist for parading around her girl squad and writing a scathing song about arch enemy Katy Perry all the while profiting off of it. Meanwhile, there are some who argue that Taylor is all about white feminism, and uses that concept only when it directly affects her.

What are your thoughts? Do you believe that Taylor Swift’s views on feminism changed? Do you think she finally understands the concept? Share your thoughts below in the comments section.

[Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images]

Comments