WWE News: The Undertaker Reveals Huge Mistake He Made As A Rookie

Even The Undertaker was a green rookie at one point in his pro wrestling career.

The Undertaker broods on his way to the ring.
WWE

Even The Undertaker was a green rookie at one point in his pro wrestling career.

The Undertaker is one of the most dominating and intimidating forces in all of professional wrestling, but even he was a rookie at one time. After three decades in the ring, the WWE legend knows that everyone has to start somewhere, and up to now, he still recalls his early days in the business. The former champion recently told a story about an early match with Bruiser Brody in which he made a big-time mistake with a legend.

For those who are fortunate enough to be in the ring with The Undertaker, they shouldn’t be afraid to make a mistake, but they need to be on their game. Being able to learn from a longtime veteran such as Taker is an honor, but the intimidation factor could end up being a bit much for them.

“Stone Cold” Steve Austin welcomed The Undertaker as his guests on Broken Skull Sessions, where he told a number of stories from his past. A particular story focused on one of Undertaker’s first matches which happened to be against Brody, and the then-rookie appeared to annoy the longtime veteran of the ring.

Taker said during the match he thought about how he was much bigger than Brody, but he ended up going at things too strong. As detailed by Ringside News, Brody even had to tell Taker to “lighten up, kid,” but Taker still accidentally hit him under the chin.

The Undertaker enters the ring on "Raw."
  WWE

The Undertaker said he doesn’t know how he became so stupid as he even started calling the match which, was a big mistake. When Taker called for a clothesline, that is when things started to really get bad for the rookie.

“No I got no brains, off he comes, right, and man I’m wound up and that furry boot comes up and wham my eyes roll back to the back of my head and I’m like, ‘Oh, wow, okay.'”

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From that moment in the match, Brody told Taker that they were “going for a walk” and “The Deadman” was thrown outside of the ring. Brody slammed Taker down onto a table and ordered him not to move for a while.

Brody picked up a chair and slammed it over The Undertaker’s back, which, to the rookie, “sounded like a gun went off.” True, it was a “painful lesson to learn,” but Taker believes that there was no one better to teach him that lesson than Brody.

The Undertaker will always be seen as someone who is a legend in professional wrestling and a lock for the WWE Hall of Fame one day. Even the greatest had to learn from someone, though, and it was Bruiser Brody’s hard-hitting style which taught him some early lessons in the ring.