NanoLight Promises Most Efficient Lightbulb Ever Made, Launches Hugely Successful Kickstarter Campaign

Nano Lightbulb

Is Kickstarter about to literally reinvent the lightbulb? A group of three graduates from the University of Toronto believe they can do just that, and they are promising the world’s most energy efficient bulb.

According to the NanoLight’s developers, the bulb uses just 12 watts of power but generates the same light as a 100-watt incandescent bulb.

Admittedly, the new lightbulb looks more like an art project than a lightbulb. In fact, the team plans to offer imprint design options on the outside of the lightbulb.

The team’s Kickstarter campaign has already raised $227,000 worth of pledges, more than ten times what the team originally asked for at $20,000. So far, more than 4,700 backers have pre-ordered the NanoLight bulbs, and there is still 11 days left in the Kickstarter campaign.

In a company statement, the researchers claim:

“We center every aspect of our work at the NanoLight around creating higher energy efficiency, reducing carbon footprints and creating ecological value in all of our products. At the most fundamental level, our purpose is to create energy efficient LED lighting that is innovative and economical, so that our planet can have a brighter future.”

Working on the NanoLight technology is solar energy expert Tom Rodinger, produce developer Gimmy CHu, and general manager of manufacturing Christian Yan. The NanoLight is being manufactured at a facility in China.

The NanoLight is slated for a July shipment date. Customers who pre-order the lightbulbs can pick them up for $45 each.

If you have purchased a NanoLight already, the team is also offering new upgrades that include:

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  • $35 – With LEAF Design – One White 10W NanoLight (75W-Equivalent)
  • $50 – With LEAF Design – One White 12W NanoLight (100W-Equivalent).
  • $100 – With LEAF Design – One White 12W NanoLight (1800 Lumens).

Here is another look at the NanoLight:

Nano Lightbulb Technology

Are you ready for a new type of lightbulb to emerge on the open market?