Brie Larson, ‘Captain Marvel’ Star, Set For Apple Series

Brie Larson at the 'Captain Marvel' premiere
Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

Captain Marvel, the first Marvel Cinematic Universe movie based on a female protagonist, arrives in theaters this week. The film stars actress Brie Larson as Carol Danvers, who becomes the titular superhero.

Signing up to play a Marvel character usually means that the actor will be busy for awhile, taking up sequels and appearances in other Marvel movies. But Larson has now signed on for another, non-Captain Marvel project.

Larson will star in a drama series for Apple’s new content platform, per Variety. The new show is based on Life Undercover: Coming of Age in the CIA, an upcoming memoir by former CIA undercover officer Amaryllis Fox. Larson will star in the series and also executive produce it.

Apple, for the last year and a half, has been producing TV series. It’s not exactly known what platform Apple plans to use to distribute its content. A CNBC report last month stated that Apple will launch its new service in April, one which would include “free original content for device owners and a subscription platform for existing digital services.”

There’s no estimated time of arrival for Larson’s CIA series.

Larson, in the run-up to the release of the Captain Marvel film, has drawn some controversy with comments she made about giving women and people of color more access to her press tours. These comments drew criticism from some fans of the Marvel movies.

This led to a campaign, per The Inquisitr, to manipulate Rotten Tomatoes’ audience score — weeks before anyone had actually seen the film — with negative comments, most of them specifically referencing Larson and her comments. One referred to Larson as “a very vocal racist and sexist aimed at white males.” Others pushed the unproven conspiracy theory that film critics are paid off by Disney to give positive reviews to Marvel films, and negative ones for rival movies.

That social media campaign caused Rotten Tomatoes to eliminate audience scores for movies prior to their releases.

“Unfortunately, we have seen an uptick in non-constructive input, sometimes bordering on trolling, which we believe is a disservice to our general readership,” Rotten Tomatoes said in a post announcing the change. “We have decided that turning off this feature for now is the best course of action.”

Captain Marvel, based on the first day and a half of reviews — 170 in total — had earned a Rotten Tomatoes score of 84 percent.