Michelle Obama Wore Show-Stopping Glitzy Thigh High Boots

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The former first last recently spoke alongside moderator Sarah Jessica Parker, donning a pair of golden, glittery, thigh high boots that stole the entire show when she came to speak about and promote her best selling memoir, Becoming. Michelle Obama’s bright yellow dress complimented the boots perfectly, and people cannot stop talking about how fabulous she looked, reports the Huffington Post.

Michelle’s boots were eye catching stilettos from Balenciaga, in metallic gold. Her gown happens to be from Balenciaga as well, from the brand’s 2018 spring and summer collection. These show-stopping stiletto boots go for $3,900.

Since the sighting of Michelle in her breathtaking attire, the public can’t stop discussing the bold outfit. The yellow gown and stunningly bold stiletto thigh high, glittery boots are certainly not a look that the former first lady would have worn during her time in the White House. She has remarked when asked, that she was aware of the statement she was making in the outfit.

During Wednesday’s event, Michelle spoke out about the impact her clothing choices had while she was the first lady. During that time, she was known for mixing and matching higher street fashion brands that were from more affordable retailers such as Target and the Gap.

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That's a wrap! When I think about all the people who have come out to our events over these past few weeks, I think about a little working-class kid named Michelle LaVaughn Robinson—an ordinary girl who had some tales to tell, some failures and some successes, too. She had a lot to learn, a lot to experience, a lot to give—more than she ever could have imagined. I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about my story lately, and what I keep coming back to is that no matter where we came from, we all share so much. People of all backgrounds, skin colors, and political persuasions can relate to feeling uncertain or overwhelmed. We’ve all been a little frustrated by the slow, frustrating growth necessary to get where we want to go. We’ve all struggled with the balancing act that can take over days, years, or decades of our lives. And I want us all to remember that these are the moments and lessons that make us who we are -- every little twist and turn, every little bump and bruise, and ultimately every joys and every triumph, no matter how large or small. So I hope all of you believe in your story. I hope you recognize that what you see as a weakness might actually be a strength. I hope you recognize the power of your voice. And I hope you remind yourself that there isn't one right way to be an American. There isn’t one way to make your contribution in this country. So thank you all for your part of our story. Thank you for being who you are. And to everyone who’s read my memoir, or come to one of our events, or posted something online, thank you for being on this journey with me. Thank you for helping me continue to become. I hope my story can serve as a boost in your own process of becoming, too. I love you all. #IAmBecoming

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“I did know that my clothes were making a statement, I knew that was the case. So we decided why don’t we use this platform to uplift some young new designers who normally wouldn’t get this kind of attention, because you can change their lives, which is one of the reasons why we chose Jason Wu for my inaugural gown. I didn’t want to wear the clothes of someone who didn’t have a good spirit, and you could hear these things, you could hear how they treated my staff or how they treated their works, so everyone I wore as far as I knew had a good spirit as well.”

Obama also discussed the issues she faced not only as the first lady, but as a black woman with all eyes on her. She stated that during that time she was well aware of just how “criticized” she would be if “perceived as being showy and high-end” yet also was being criticized at the same time for being “too casual.” It was apparently a “think line to walk.”

“I hated that feeling. There are whole lot of people out here who are trying to make it, there are young women and immigrants and black folk.”