Galaxy X: Samsung Walks Back On Foldable Phone’s November Release Date

Samsung is seemingly back to delaying the Galaxy X's release.

Samsung might be delaying the Galaxy X again.
Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Samsung is seemingly back to delaying the Galaxy X's release.

Not long after showing signs that it is ready to reveal what could very well be its most important smartphone since the first Galaxy Note, Samsung appears to have walked back on its intentions to release the Galaxy X this coming November. With this in mind, it appears that for all intents and purposes, the Galaxy X is delayed once more.

Just recently, Samsung CEO DJ Koh noted in a CNBC interview that the company might be ready to reveal a revolutionary new device come November. The Samsung CEO did not mention the Galaxy X by name, but he did tease some of the upcoming device’s features that have long been connected to the near-mythical smartphone. One of these, for example, was the handset’s capability to be folded in and out.

“You can use most of the uses… on foldable status. But when you need to browse or see something, then you may need to unfold it. But even unfolded, what kind of benefit does that give compared to the tablet? If the unfolded experience is the same as the tablet, why would they (consumers) buy it? So every device, every feature, every innovation should have a meaningful message to our end customer. So when the end customer uses it, (they think) ‘wow, this is the reason Samsung made it,'” Koh said.

According to a recent report from Korea Herald, however, Samsung has now dismissed the rumors that the company is finally ready to release the foldable Galaxy X by November. Samsung reportedly noted that the company’s official stance on the upcoming smartphone had not been confirmed yet. Samsung did, however, state that some details of the smartphone could be announced at the event, since the device is nearing completion.

“We will have more to say about the phone under development by that time, probably some details about specifications,” a spokesperson for the company said.

At this point in the foldable smartphone race, another delay on Samsung’s part could prove to be damaging for the company. The current form factor of smartphones has already matured to the point where innovation is proving difficult. Samsung has the chance to push the market with the Galaxy X, but its insistence on delaying the device for years now has to be testing the market’s patience.

Unfortunately for Samsung, the company is not alone in developing foldable smartphone tech. Patents have already been granted to fellow South Korean tech giant and rival LG for a foldable device, and even upstart smartphone makers like Oppo are literally looking to Samsung to provide flexible displays for their own foldable smartphones. If Samsung misses the mark with the Galaxy X, the company could very well find itself behind competitors it could have easily beaten had it gotten to the market first.