August Solar Eclipse: When And Where To Catch The August 2018 Partial Solar Eclipse

Are you ready for the partial solar eclipse next weekend?

Partial Solar Eclipse in Pathum Thani, Thailand.
Panumas Sanguanwong / Shutterstock

Are you ready for the partial solar eclipse next weekend?

August is an exciting time to look up at the night sky and check out the dazzling celestial displays unfolding before your eyes.

Right before the peak of the Perseid meteor shower, which occurs on August 12-13, as the Inquisitr recently reported, sky watchers will be treated to a solar eclipse, taking place on August 11.

Next weekend’s solar eclipse is a partial one, meaning that the sun won’t be completely obscured by the new moon passing in front of it. Instead, our biggest star will look like the moon merely took a bite out of it, since the lunar disk will only partly come between Earth and the sun.

The official start of the solar eclipse is 4:02 a.m. EDT (08:02 GMT), when sky watchers can see the first “contact” between the moon and the solar disk. The celestial event peaks at 5:46 a.m. EDT (09:46 GMT), when the maximum eclipse will be at a magnitude 0.7361.

The August, 2018, eclipse will only be visible in a select few locations, per a previous Inquisitr report. Unfortunately, the U.S. is not among them, as the August solar eclipse will only be witnessed by viewers in northern parts of North America, in northern and eastern Europe, and in northern and western Asia.

For the rest of the world interested in watching the solar eclipse, Bustle has compiled a list of media outlets that will provide live coverage of the August 11 celestial event.

Where To Watch The August Solar Eclipse

If you live in the U.S. and you’re not up for a trip to Canada or Greenland to watch the August solar eclipse first-hand, you might need to settle for following the media coverage on next week’s big event.

Here are the best online sources that will be livestreaming the August eclipse, according to Bustle:

  • The Virtual Telescope Project — this specialized website will tell you everything that goes on in the sky and is described by Bustle as being “a great educational resource,” as well as “totally entertaining.”
  • Time And Date — the web page already displays a countdown until the solar eclipse next weekend and provides historical information on solar eclipses, along with helpful illustrations.
  • CBS News — the media outlet will also be covering the August 11 solar eclipse in real time, so feel free to check it out, especially if you can’t watch the eclipse news on cable.
  • Space.com — the website offers extensive information on every type of astronomical events, including the August, 2018, partial solar eclipse.
  • The Weather Channel App — if you haven’t downloaded this free app yet, you might want to give it a try, as it provides a wealth of information on astronomical events, in addition to live coverage of the August 11 solar eclipse.
  • Space & Universe (Official) — the YouTube channel frequently uploads NASA footage of various celestial events, so keep it in mind for next weekend.

When Is The Next Solar Eclipse?

The upcoming astronomical event will mark the third partial solar eclipse taking place this year. The previous one occurred on July 13 and was only visible in the southernmost parts of Australia.

Partial solar eclipse.
A partial solar eclipse as seen from Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. David McNew / Getty Images

Another partial solar eclipse unfolded on February 15, to the delight of viewers in southern South America, and anyone watching from the Atlantic Ocean and Antarctica, notes Space.com.

While 2018 doesn’t feature any total solar eclipses, next year comes with a magnificent total solar eclipse on July 2, which will be visible in the South Pacific, Chile, and Argentina. North America will have to wait until June 20, 2021, to witness a total solar eclipse.

The last total solar eclipse took place on August 21, 2017, and was the first to be seen all across the U.S. in almost 100 years, Space.com reported at the time.