As Anthony Bourdain’s Net Worth Grew, His Charitable Works Also Increased

Bourdain was one to give back.

Anthony Bourdain hosts a food fight.
Larry French / Getty Images

Bourdain was one to give back.

As tributes to Anthony Bourdain pour in from fans and celebrities around the world, one thing is clear — people are remembering the chef and TV personality for the nice and amazing human that he was.

As the Inquisitr reported earlier today, the 61-year-old chef was found dead in his hotel room in Paris, France. He was reportedly there filming his hit series, Parts Unknown, when his friend Eric Ripert made the tragic discovery.

According to Newsweek, Bourdain put in blood, sweat, and tears as he worked his way to superstardom, starting a job as a cook who pocketed about $40 cash per shift and growing an empire worth an estimated $16 million, though when he was alive, Bourdain claims that the $16 million was not accurate.

“I think the people who calculate these things assume that I live a lot more sensibly than I do. I mean, I don’t live recklessly — I have one car. But I don’t deprive myself simple pleasures. I’m not a haggler. There’s not enough time in the world. I tend to go for the quickest, easiest, what’s comfortable. I want it now. Time’s running out,” he confessed while saying that those estimates are “ten times” more than what he is actually worth.

In one of his books, he also wrote that when he is gone, he wants his loved ones taken care of so they wouldn’t have to worry if “something bad” happens. So he had based all of his savings and investments on being able to take care of his family.

“I’d like my daughter and her mom looked after, both while I’m alive and after.”

#Firenze @asiaargento La Primavera

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While he was alive, Bourdain made sure to give back and was constantly donating to charities. In 2016, he hosted the 14th Annual Taste the Best of NYC to help raise money for the Urban Assembly Bronx Academy of Letters. He also got roasted one year at the New York Wine and Food Festival to benefit a charity with a $400-a-plate event. And he even worked with the Make-A-Wish Foundation, granting a wish to a 16-year-old from Arizona who had Hodgkin’s lymphoma, agreeing to meet with her and fulfill her wish.

SF Gate also points out that Bourdain used his show, No Reservations, as a platform, focusing the attention on the struggles and poverty in many different places around the world. One episode abroad showed the devastation in Haiti following an earthquake, while another episode based in the United States showed New Orleans, post-Katrina. Not only was his show educating people about different foods and cultures, it was also educating people about bad things that are happening across the globe and bringing focus to those issues as well.

It’s clear that Anthony Bourdain will be missed by many.


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