MacBook Pro 2018: Apple May Avoid Addressing Its Butterfly Keyboard Issues At WWDC 2018

The pervading issue of Apple's Butterfly keyboards might be swept under the rug in this year's conference.

Apple might not address its MacBook line's Butterfly Keyboard issues in this year's WWDC 2018.
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The pervading issue of Apple's Butterfly keyboards might be swept under the rug in this year's conference.

Apple will be hosting its WWDC 2018 even on Monday, June 4. Many speculations are spreading about the software upgrades and some gadgets the Cupertino-based company could reveal at the World Wide Development Conference. Unfortunately, providing a permanent solution to the butterfly keyboard issues on the 2015-and-later MacBooks and the 2016-and-later MacBook Pros might not be on Apple’s agenda for WWDC 2018.

Bloomberg predicts that Apple will not focus on hardware upgrades at this year’s WWDC. Most consumers might be surprised by this prediction. After all, the tech-giant updated its MacBook and MacBook Pro lineup last year. There are also rumors that the California-based company is working on upgrades for the MacBook Pro, 12-inch MacBook, and even a more affordable MacBook Air. However, the publication states that people who know of Apple’s plans for the Mac lineup have shared that those products are not ready for WWDC 2018.

If the tech company isn’t introducing a new addition to its Mac line on June 4, then it will most likely not be addressing the butterfly keyboard issue. As The Verge notes, Apple is not known for openly admitting flaws in its products. The company’s heads usually introduce upgrades to their products which fix the flaws without addressing or referring to the issues directly.

As previously reported, Girard Gibbs filed a class-action lawsuit against Apple based on a petition signed by 20,000 on Change.org. The petition was signed by people who found Apple’s new butterfly keyboard to be flawed. The new keyboard technology consistently resulted in sticky and unresponsive keys. Schubert Jonckheer & Kolbe filed a second class-action lawsuit for the same reasons, reported MacRumors.

Multiple 2015-and-later MacBook or 2016-and-later MacBook Pro users — who did not have warranties for their Apple laptops — had to pay between $400 and $700 to fix their keyboards. Despite the replacements, however, some MacBook and MacBook Pro users still ended up with sticky and unresponsive keys. Despite the costly fixes, the issue with Apple’s butterfly keyboard persist.

Both Gurman and Quartz seem to suggest that Apple will focus more on software at this year’s WWDC. iOS 12 is expected to take center stage at the event. Apple might also focus on promoting Digital Health, its new initiative. Digital Health encompasses a new mindset spreading across Silicon Valley. More and more people are aware of the effects the digital world has on an individual’s health. Thus, Apple created a slew of tools to help iPhone owners gradually decrease the amount of time they spend on their devices.