White House Sinkhole Meme: The Funniest Jokes To Come Out Of The Hole In The North Lawn

Jacquelyn MartinAP Images

The White House sinkhole, which opened up on the North Lawn of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue on Tuesday, has now become the subject of internet humor, turning into memes, cheeky British humor, and even parody social media accounts.

As CNN reports, Washington was inundated with rain for a week before Tuesday, leaving the grounds of the White House soggy and saturated. And considering that Washington was built on a swamp (a swamp which Trump metaphorically promised to drain during his campaign), it should come as no surprise that sometimes the ground is going to lose its battles with the sky. And that’s exactly what happened: A one-foot hole opened up in the ground not far from the entrance to the White House briefing room.

For now, the National Park Service – which manages the White House and its grounds – has addressed the problem by putting a plank of wood over it.

Meanwhile, the media and the internet have all gone crazy turning this situation into a minefield of snark.

First, there’s the cheeky headline from a British newspaper. The Guardian, for example, says that Mother Nature sent a poetic message by opening up the ground at the White House.

“The earth literally opening up outside Donald Trump’s residence seems too good to be true.”

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Then there’s the fact that the sinkhole now has its own parody Twitter account because of course, it does.

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Twitter user @nosoupforgeorge notes that Trump’s brand has been bedeviled by sinkholes before. Literally, a year to the day that the sinkhole opened up at the White House, one opened up at Trump’s Florida golf resort Mar-a-Lago.

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Then everybody’s favorite internet prankster George Takei got in on the action.

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“God,” for his part, disavowed the sinkhole.

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Joking aside, the sinkhole appears to be more of a minor, cosmetic problem than an actual threat to the structural integrity of the White House. National Park officials say it does not pose a risk to the two-century-old building, nor does it signify larger problems.