Lana Del Rey Claims Copyright Dispute With Radiohead Is Settled, Reports ‘Pitchfork’

Lana Del Rey's copyright dispute for her song, 'Get Free,' and Radiohead's 'Creep' has been settled.

Lana Del Rey 'Get Free' Lawsuit settled.
Jamie McCarthy / Getty Images

Lana Del Rey's copyright dispute for her song, 'Get Free,' and Radiohead's 'Creep' has been settled.

Lana Del Rey was happy to announce to fans that her legal difficulties with Radiohead are over and have been settled. Back in January, Del Rey said that Radiohead was suing her over her song, “Get Free” because the catchy song was much too similar to the alternative rock band’s hit 1993 song, “Creep.”

Lana Del Rey had previously tweeted that Radiohead was asking for 100 percent of the publishing rights to the song. According to Pitchfork, Del Rey said that the lawsuit could result in the song being removed from her album. However, once Lana spoke out, a spokesperson from Radiohead’s publishing company, Warner/Chappell, denied the existence of a lawsuit altogether.

Lana’s song “Get Free” is the last song on her fifth studio album, Lust for Life, which has hit major milestones all over the world, including the U.K. and the U.S.

It was reported that during Del Rey’s set at Lollapalooza Brazil, the songstress told the crowd, “Now that my lawsuit’s over, I guess I can sing that song [“Get Free”] any time I want, right?”

Earlier this year, a source told Daily Mail that Radiohead was in negotiations with Lana Del Rey’s team about trying to settle the discrepancies behind the scenes instead of heading to court.

“It’s understood that Radiohead’s team are hoping for the band to either receive compensation or be credited on the list of songwriters to receive royalties.”

Lana Del Rey responded to the reports on Twitter and acknowledged the legal drama. However, the 32-year-old singer defended “Get Free” and said that her song was not inspired by “Creep.”

According to Variety, Del Rey tried to fix things quickly by offering Radiohead 40 percent of the publishing for “Get Free.” Del Rey then added that Radiohead refused to accept anything less than 100 percent of the publishing.

“Although I know my song wasn’t inspired by ‘Creep,’ Radiohead feel it was and want 100% of the publishing – I offered up 40 over the last few months but they will only accept 100.”

Lana stated that Radiohead’s lawyers have been relentless, “so we will deal with it in court.”

Interestingly enough, fans of both artists confirmed the major similarities between Lana’s song, “Get Free” and Radiohead’s “Creep.” Several of Radiohead’s loyal fans teased the singer and gave Lana the nickname of “Lana Del Reydiohead.”

Below is the hit song “Creep” by Radiohead. The video was uploaded to Radiohead’s official YouTube channel and has over 260 million views. An audio version of Lana Del Rey’s “Get Free” can be found here.

However, Radiohead is no stranger to copyright infringement lawsuits. The British alternative rock band has faced similar legal action after they gave “Creep” songwriting credits on the Pablo Honey song to Albert Hammond and Mike Hazlewood, according to Rolling Stone. Hammond and Hazelwood are the writers of the Hollies’ hit, “The Air That I Breathe.”