James Woods Supports Brendan Fraser, Says He Was Blacklisted By HFPA Over Hillary Clinton

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A recent GQ interview with Brendan Fraser has taken the internet by storm, as the actor admitted he had been sexually assaulted by former Hollywood Foreign Press Association President Philip Berk. Shortly after the article went live, Terry Crews spoke out in defense of Fraser, and now actor James Woods is doing the same.

Woods was a prominent actor who began his career in the early 1970’s and earned himself nine Golden Globe nominations. However, Woods’ career came to a screeching halt, which he blamed on his conservative political views. According to Fox News, the actor has always been an outspoken Republican and has claimed in the past this was a reason for his blacklisting.

Now, after Fraser’s interview, Woods was inspired and took to Twitter to declare the specifics behind his blacklisting by the HFPA, which happened while Berk was still president. After recommending theGQ article to his followers, he then detailed a quick story about how a conversation with Berk changed his entire career.

According to Woods, he was at a press junket with the HFPA (who determines Golden Globe nominees and winners) and got into a political discussion with Berk. Woods claimed Berk asked him if he would support Hillary Clinton if she ever ran for president. While Woods did not share what his specific answer was, he suggested it was a “no” since his political views did not align with Clintons.

After his conversation with Berk, Woods said he was never nominated for a Golden Globe again.

Woods made sure to clarify in a second tweet that he was not sexually assaulted by Berk like Fraser was and that he was blacklisted strictly based on his political views. The actor believed Berk knew Woods would have “knocked his teeth out” if he ever got “physically sketchy” with him.

The 70-year-old ended his second tweet in support of Fraser again, admitting he was happy to see the actor back in the business and claimed to be “a big fan.”

Woods earned Golden Globe nominations for his films The Onion Field and Ghosts of Mississippi. He also earned nominations for his work on television for Promise (which he won), In Love and War, My Name is Bill W., Citizen Cohn, Indictment: The McMartin Trial and Dirty Pictures.

His nomination in 2001 for Dirty Pictures would be his last Golden Globe nod to date.