Terrell Owens Finally Makes It Into Pro Football Hall Of Fame

The Pro Football Hall of Fame finally decides to let Terrell Owens in.

Why did it take so long for Terrell Owens to make Hall of Fame?
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The Pro Football Hall of Fame finally decides to let Terrell Owens in.

After two unsuccessful tries, Terrell Owens will finally get his bust in Canton, Ohio, as reported by ESPN. Saturday evening, Owens was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. What has kept Owens out in his first two tries may have been his relationship with the media, however, it was only a matter of time before his numbers took center stage.

For his career, Owens was a five-time All-Pro player with career totals of 1078 receptions (8th), 15,934 yards (2nd), and 153 receiving touchdowns (3rd). And yet, for two years, the NFL decided he wasn’t worthy. However, the wait is finally over for the outspoken wide receiver.

Owens, who was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in the third round in 1996 to be the heir apparent to Jerry Rice, struggled in his first season. In his rookie year, Owens caught 35 passes for 524 yards with four touchdowns. Those were his lowest numbers during a stellar 15-year career. During his time with the 49ers, Owens staked a claim as one of the best young receivers in the NFL, as he accumulated 592 receptions for 8,572 yards and 81 receiving touchdowns.

In 2004, he moved on to the Philadelphia Eagles where he was paired with Donovan McNabb and Andy Reid. During that magical season for the Eagles, Owens produced to the tune of 77 receptions for 1,200 yards and 14 touchdowns, as the Eagles made it to the Super Bowl. Injured for the playoffs, Owens, with a screw in his ankle, gutted it out for the Super Bowl, where the Eagles lost to the New England Patriots. Despite the loss and injury, Owens finished the game with a stat line of nine receptions for 122 yards.

After a season of controversy in 2005 with McNabb and the Eagles, Owens moved on to the Dallas Cowboys to pair with Tony Romo and Jerry Jones. Although there were no Super Bowl appearances, Owens proved that his last season (47 receptions) in Philadelphia was just a fluke. During his time in Dallas, Owens caught 235 passes for 3,587 yards and 38 touchdowns.

Owens finished the last two seasons of his career playing for the Buffalo Bills (2009) and Cincinnati Bengals (2010) before calling it quits in 2010. While a great receiver, Owens may be remembered more for his attitude with the media and off-the-field issues. Despite what he has been through throughout his life and career, Owens has been deemed one of the greatest wide receivers in NFL history.