Princess Diana Supplied Lingerie Posters To Prince William And Harry: Queen’s Bra-Fitter Claims

Rigby & Peller loses royal warrant over memoir, 'Storm in a D Cup.'

Princess Diana’s death has been controversial for the Royal family.
Princess Diana Archive / Getty Images

Rigby & Peller loses royal warrant over memoir, 'Storm in a D Cup.'

Princess Diana apparently supplied lingerie posters to her sons, Prince William and Harry, so that they could hang those in their study. At least, that’s what June Kenton, the director of Rigby & Peller, has claimed in her book.

“Storm in a D Cup” was released in March last year. However, its effect seems to be strong even now. According to reports, Buckingham Palace has stripped the London-based lingerie retailer off the royal warranty over the tell-all book.

The 82-year-old was in tears to claim that she did not mean any offense to the Royals. Kenton believes there is nothing “naughty” in her book that should embarrass the Royals. Now that the Royal family has canceled the warranty, she feels “deeply saddened” by the decision.

June Kenton’s autobiography might not have revealed anything deeply personal about the Royal family. However, the Royals are extremely private about anything related to them anyway. Kenton regularly served the Royals. During her visits to Buckingham Palace, she had working relationships with Princess Margaret, the Queen, and the Queen Mother.

Kenton also revealed that she had regular interactions with Princess Diana. What she revealed in her book about Lady Di might not go well with her admirers.

Prince Harry will get married to girlfriend Meghan Markle this year.
  John Phillips / Getty Images

“I never met Diana’s boys, but I used to give her lingerie and swimwear posters for them to put up in their studies at Eton,” the New York Post quoted Kenton as writing in her autobiography.

Kenton also referred to one of her conversations with the Queen Mother, who talked about her difference of opinion with Princess Margaret. The Queen Mother apparently told Kenton that she would pretend to listen to Margaret’s opinions on hats and, once she was gone, she would order what she wanted.

June Kenton’s autobiography, which is for sale on Amazon, has got just one review. Mary Brown, while giving it one star, wrote that it was “unsavory” for Kenton to talk about her clients in the book. After all, those were the women “who trusted her when getting their bras fitted,” she wrote. According to her, the book is, nevertheless, “embarrassingly poorly written.”

According to The Guardian, it is against the regulations for Buckingham Palace to comment on individual companies, when it comes to the cancellation of the Royal warranty.