Trump Asks All White House Workers To ‘Thank Him Personally’ For His ‘Greatest Achievements’ On Tax Bill

Evan VucciAP Images

President Donald Trump is taking his victory laps on Wednesday, December 20, with the president taking to Twitter in the early morning hours to write about the “biggest in history Tax Cut and Reform Bill” that passed in the U.S. Senate. The Senate passed the tax reform bill, as reported by Bloomberg, with the vote reached at approximately 12:45 a.m., even though the bill has not gained favorable ratings in polls of public opinion.

As seen in the below tweet, Trump claimed that the tax reductions would be huge and meaningful, but blamed the “Fake News” culprits and democrats for demeaning his tax bill. Trump went on to write that the results of the tax changes will speak for themselves by producing, “Jobs, Jobs, Jobs!” Trump went on to thank U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for his “fantastic job.” However, according to another popular Twitter account purporting to leak news directly from the West Wing, it is Trump who wants folks to praise him.

According to the below tweet from the “Rogue WH Snr Advisor” Twitter account, Trump told certain White House staff members in a morning meeting that he is asking everyone in the White House to “thank him personally” in the near future since the controversial tax bill represents “one of the greatest achievements by any president.” The Twitter account is getting questions from social media users wondering what will happen to White House workers who don’t thank Trump personally.

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In the meantime, while Trump’s Twitter persona rages on, Sarah Huckabee Sanders is defending Trump against any negative perceptions and images. According to the Washington Post, Sanders has blamed the media for Trump’s sinking approval ratings. Trump is planning to have a press conference at 1 p.m. to crow about the tax reform bill, which political pundits believe will pass the House as well as the Senate.

According to a poll from NBC News and the Wall Street Journal, only 24 percent of Americans overall believe the tax plan is a good one. That percentage increases slightly based on the education level of the person being polled and based upon their location, such as rural Americans.

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