Jessica Alba Leaked Sex Tape Hoax: Clicking This Facebook Link Will Lead To Big Problems For Your Computer

Anyone who comes across a Jessica Alba leaked sex tape link on Facebook should think twice before clicking on it.

The actress is apparently being used as bait for a scam that attempts to trick people into clicking on a link for a sex tape that instead installs a malicious program on their computer.

The scheme was detailed by a researcher at Cyren, who noted that a malicious Google Chrome extension is spreading nude celebrity PDFs to various Facebook groups that takes users of Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Safari to “an aggressive advertising webpage (nudity, fake lottery).”

A Jessica Alba sex tape link is actually spreading a virus on Facebook.
[Featured Image by Vivien Killilea/Getty Images]

But the Jessica Alba sex tape scam is even more aggressive with Google Chrome users, the report noted.

“However, if the user is using Google Chrome, the link opened is ‘hxxps://rb-xxxxxx.xxx/gxxxxo.php’ and shows a phony YouTube site. Clicking the play button brings up a pop-up window inviting the user to install a Google Chrome extension. After installing that extension, the browser opens up a Facebook.com login page. The extension is able to read the user’s friend list, Facebook groups, plus all personal information and upload the PDF to groups, posts, and to friends in private chat.”

The Jessica Alba leaked sex tape hoax is the latest in a series of scams to target Facebook users. As the Express noted, a flaw in image-processing on social media sites last month led to the spread of the Locky ransomware, which told users that they needed to pay the hacker a ransom to restore access to their sites.

Jessica Alba is being used as bait for a hacking scam
[Image by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images]

And other hoaxes have also used sensational news stories to entice Facebook users to click what turned out to be a scam. In September, a viral hoax claimed that actor Brad Pitt had taken his life — a story that circulated just after the real-life news that Pitt and wife Angelina Jolie were splitting up.

The story was made to look like a real article from FoxNews.com, using the news site’s background with the headline “FOX BREAKING NEWS: BRAD PITT Found dead [SUICIDE]” in large letters. Those who tried to click on the story were instead directed to a screen asking them to allow “Fox Breaking News” to access their user profile.

As Snopes pointed out, once users agreed to the terms, they were met with a crudely written article claiming that Brad Pitt had died.

“Brad Pitt, 52, a multiawarded American actor and husband of Angelina Jolie, 41, shot himself in the head at a shooting range on Sunday. He was under significant stress because the couple ‘were going through a divorce and he had a history of depression’, sources have said.”

As the U.K.’s Mirror noted, there have been a number of other phishing scams disguised as celebrity death hoax stories, including one claiming actor Jaden Smith had died.

“The hoax – which involves getting permission to post on the user’s page on the social media site – has been spread by people noticing it on their newsfeed as more and more people click on the fake link.

“The spam apps lured many users in, but Jaden – who is yet to respond to the rumors – is alive and well four years after a similarly cruel prank.”

And the Jessica Alba leaked sex tape is a page out of the same playbook. No such video actually exists (at least not one that’s available online), and users who try to click the link will find that the scam takes over before they can get anywhere.

So if you come across a link claiming to show a leaked sex tape of Jessica Alba, remember to just report it and keep on scrolling.

[Featured Image by Marco Garcia/Getty Images]