Execs Eyeing ‘Harry Potter And The Cursed Child’ Movie But With Daniel Radcliffe In It

Film executives are reportedly eager to bring the Harry Potter and the Cursed Child play onto silver screens come 2020. However, according to a New York Daily News insider, Warner Bros. only wants Daniel Radcliffe if the plan will come into fruition.

“Warners is secretly working on getting the movie rights and a screenplay settled, and of course in their minds only one man should be Harry. However, he has made it clear that his mind is certainly not focused on returning to the role anytime soon — and that could be until he hits 40.”

Warner Bros. is allegedly willing to spend loads of cash to reposition the play as a trilogy. The trilogy’s storyline will focus on Potter’s son, Albus Severus. A representative for the studio declined to comment.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
[Photo by Ben A. Pruchnie/Getty Images]

The insider added that it would take a great deal of persuading in order to convince the 27-year-old actor to reprise his role as The Boy Who Lived.

“Daniel had that job for over a decade with huge success and critical acclaim, but since then he has really established himself as a very strong actor with films like The Woman in Black and his Broadway work. He doesn’t need to go back for money or to reboot his career, so he will need some persuading.”

Earlier this month, the British actor revealed to Sirius XM’s Andy Cohen Live that while he appreciates what the iconic role did for his career, he’s at this point where he doesn’t feel comfortable returning.

“You never want to close a door on anything, especially something that’s been so good to me. But I do think, at the moment, I’m definitely not at a stage where I would feel comfortable going back to it. Who knows if in 10, 20 years I would feel differently about that, and I think I’ve got a little while before I’m sort of age-appropriate for this Harry.”

His lack of enthusiasm to reprise his role shouldn’t be deemed as a sign of ungratefulness because at the end of the day, Radcliffe considers himself “lucky to be associated with something that people absolutely love.”

He talked to EW Morning Live about how people would approach him to simply thank him for the impact of Harry Potter in their childhood. Radcliffe played the titular character in eight films.

“I’m always going to be grateful for Potter. I wouldn’t be doing any of the other things that I do if I hadn’t got that part, so there’s never going to be a day where I don’t have a debt of gratitude that makes me very happy to hear people talk about it.”

Unlike Emma Watson and Rupert Grint, Radcliffe has not yet watched the West End play helmed by Jack Thorne and John Tiffany. He previously said that he might not watch the show fearing that his presence might be a distraction. He plans on reading the manuscript when he gets the chance.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Play
Sonia Friedman, Jack Thorne, J. K. Rowling, John Tiffany and Colin Callender attend the press preview of "Harry Potter & The Cursed Child" [Photo by Rob Stothard/Getty Images]

Meanwhile, Potterheads are still clamoring for tickets for the Harry Potter and the Cursed Child play. Tickets for the critically-acclaimed show are being resold in third-party channels for staggering amounts. One ticket sold for $10,680. The ticket is only for the second installment of the two-part play.

CNBC cites StubHub as an example of a site that resells the ticket with an astonishing mark up. A single ticket for the play’s April 8 run is being sold for $6,589 as opposed to its original value of $85.

Britain criminalized the unauthorized reselling of tickets in 1994, but the rule only applies to soccer tickets. Plays and concerts remain untouched by the regulation.

Nonetheless, fans planning to purchase from scalpers must take note that some were denied entry because of tickets that came from unauthorized sellers. At least sixty ticketholders have been recently turned away by the play’s staff.

Producers Sonia Friedman and Collin Callender told the Standard that they’re working hard to protect the rights of customers.

“We have already been able to identify, and refuse entry to a significant number of people who purchased tickets through resale sites and will continue to track down touts and refuse entry to anyone who has knowingly bought a ticket from a tout through the secondary market.”

Resale sites like StubHub and Viagogo promise to reimburse rejected tickets.

[Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty Images]