May 8, 2016
No Indication North Carolina Governor Will Repeal Transgender Bathroom Law, Blames Liberal Left

FOX News Sunday with Chris Wallace interviewed the governor of North Caroline Pat McCrory over the transgender bathroom law, wondering why the state was so determined to enforce it, despite the fact that businesses were refusing to do business there because of it.

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWRPT2DaBnE[/embed]

Certainly the boycott of businesses such as Deutsche Bank and PayPal were mentioned, but the main issue discussed was around the fact that the Department Of Justice was putting pressure on the state over North Carolina's bathroom law.

As a result of those boycotts, a reported $77 million has been lost, but the letter sent to the governor last Wednesday, with its Monday deadline to respond, could impact millions more in federal money to North Carolina's universities.

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory has been on the defense in front of the press, saying that they will respond to the federal government, but he does not appear to budge from his position in time for the deadline.

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory at Government Affairs Conference, May 4, 2016.
North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory pauses while making comments concerning House Bill 2 during a government affairs conference in Raleigh, N.C., Wednesday, May 4, 2016. In the talk, he says that this issue was only coming out of the woodwork now because of the Obama administration and the left. [Image by Gerry Broome | AP Photo]On May 4, 2016 the Governor attended a government affairs conference to talk about the bill, where it was stated that the federal government could pull an estimated 900 million from the schools.

Just as the interview with Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday has the North Carolina governor saying that the left is to blame, he has said during the conference much of the same and even on the Megyn Kelly File from the same network.

In the same conference, he began blaming the Obama administration by saying that liberal Super PACs were involved as part of a "well-oiled machine" to attack his signing of the law.

From many of these interviews over the last few weeks and coming up to the deadline given by the federal government, not only has the governor of North Carolina blamed liberals, but he has also accused PayPal of "selective hypocrisy," as they do business in places in the Middle East, where the laws are even more strict.

Now, many are wondering if the pressure from the federal government -- which McCrory calls "bullying" -- will cause him to repeal, which is likely not the case.

Because according to Education Drive which reported on how the transgender bathroom law is now stirring up the education community in other states nationwide, he might get the support he needs to resist.

The federal government has formally directed school districts to treat students according to the gender identify they choose for themselves, regardless of what was listed on birth certificates, opening the door for districts to embrace progressive approaches. Yet some locales seem to be ignoring the mandate, moving instead in the opposite direction.

South Dakota's legislature approved a bill this February that defies federal law, ordering transgender students to use bathrooms according to their "chromosomes and anatomy" at birth. Twenty-two other states are now poised to consider similar legislation.

North Carolina protesters against HB2 bill
Protesters against North Carolina's HB2 Bill, in Asheville, 2016. [J. Bicking | Shutterstock.com]The article also provides examples from the state of Kentucky, but it would also seem that, according to an article recently published by The Inquisitr, if a certain Sheriff is elected for Denton, Texas, he might enforce a more aggressive stance on the transgender bathroom law as well.

Unlike North Carolina however, if there are aggressive citizens who decide to act out against transgender bathroom users, it isn't clear as to whether the state will cover hospital expenses or not.

[image by Emery P. Dalesio | AP Photo]