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Adele Says She Will Not Be Portrayed By Rebel Wilson: Amy Schumer Echos Plus-Size Anger

Adele and Amy Schumer are not really plus-size. They are actually about average, but their anger went all the way to XXX large as they each received what they interpreted as insults aimed at their weight.

Adele lashed out with a bit of profanity when she read that Rebel Wilson would be playing her in a film. She was obviously angry when she replied to the rumor on stage at the O2 Arena in London on Monday, April 5, as reported by Metro.

“I’ve heard there are rumors about – Rebel Wilson will be playing me in a movie – let’s see if that turns out to be true. You don’t get to make a film without my f**king permission. Shut up. There’s no film, Just because I’m plus-sized doesn’t mean she’s playing me.”

Rebel Wilson responded gently, tweeting no one ever approached her about the role, although she had quipped last year to the Daily Mail people often mistake her for Adele.

Adele by Ian Gavan

Adele was right. There was never any biopic film about her. Both Adele and Rebel have now denied the bit of fiction created by one of the many celebrity gossip pages running the story last week.

Amy Schumer was also slipped into the plus-size category even though she is just a size eight. The comedian was recently included in a Glamour Magazine article titled “Chic At Any Size” alongside Adele, Ashley Graham, and Melissa McCarthy. Schumer, who freely revealed she weighs 160 pounds, according to the New York Daily News, took to Twitter to express her frustration.

“Young girls seeing my body type thinking that is plus size? Not cool Glamour not glamorous, Plus size is considered size 16 in America,”

Amy Schumer by Jason Merritt

Juliette Gash responded to Amy Schumer, rallying behind the comedian and speaking out for all women in a well-phrased tweet.

“I don’t think labels are the way to go. Singling women out for their size, and making a point about it is never glamorous.”

Amy Schumer got an apology from Glamour in a statement prepared by editor-in-chief Cindi Leive published in the New York Daily News. The international Business Times quoted the statement.

“We love Amy Schumer, and would never want to offend her. To be clear, @glamourmag special edition never called her plus-size. Her 2015 cover story was included in the edition, aimed at sizes 12 and up, with the coverline ‘Women who Inspire Us’ [because] her longtime message of body positivity — and talking back to body haters — IS inspiring.”

Adele, Amy Schumer, and Rebel Wilson are just a few of the women who are often insulted because of their weight even though they are average size.

Amy Schumer is actually smaller than the average American woman. While size eight and up is considered plus size in the modeling industry, 16 or 18 are the smallest plus sizes. Size 14 is average for an American woman. The average woman is five-foot-four and weighs about 166 pounds, according to the CDC.

Adele is actually pretty average. Rebel Wilson is also a common size. This is how most women are built. The fashion industry is resisting the trend real American bodies are manifesting. As most women are getting larger, models have gotten smaller. The Mirror reported that teenage girls as young as 13 are being recruited from Russia for the modeling industry. The trend was featured in a Reggie Yates documentary, titled Extreme Russia: Teen Model Factory. The video shows very young, already malnourished girls being starved so they can stay slim enough to model. What might this say about fashion industry standards and their impact on society?

Cleveland reports that size 12 to 18 ladies buy fewer clothes than women who are either larger or smaller. The reasons include poor fit, body image issues, and, surprisingly, scarcity. It is hard to find those sizes. The fashion industry serves smaller than average women and girls only. Plus-size companies sprang up to fill the void, but there is still a gap in the market.

Adele, Amy Schumer, and Rebel Wilson aren’t just talking about fashion, though. They are sounding off on people’s attitudes. Rebel often tells people that she is comfortable with her appearance and encourages others to have a good self-image regardless of weight. Being public figures, these ladies encounter even more of the same attitudes all average-sized ladies face when confronted with unrealistic expectations.

Adele and Amy Schumer are sticking up for average American women.

[Photo by Jason Merritt, Jason Kempin, and Ian Gavan]