Oculus Rift Closes Door To Raunchy Content But Leaves Window Open For Violent Games

When the Oculus Rift burst onto the scene several years ago, a lot of people automatically knew the virtual reality headset would be great for two things – gaming and porn.

Imagine the joy developers and fans felt when Oculus founder Palmer Luckey said they will not be blocking any X-rated content or applications.

“This is an open platform. We don’t control what software can run on it,” Luckey explained, before adding “And that’s a big deal.”

It certainly is a big deal – a big, money making deal – as a virtual headset can make watching adult more intimate and real.

Fans were already looking forward to getting their hands on an Oculus Rift headset when it goes on sale early next year. They were also excited to check what games and applications (and adult content) will make it to its app store.

However, the company appears to have had a change of heart when it comes to using the device for raunchier reasons.

A spokesman for the Facebook-owned company has tried to explain the sudden 360 by reminding people that “Oculus only distributes developer content that meets their terms of service, which forbid pornographic content from being a part of the Oculus Store.”

Of course, disappointed fans voiced their feelings on social media before turning their minds to the other use of the Rift, games. More specifically, violent games.

Surprisingly, the company was quite noncommittal with its answer.

“Oculus only distributes developer content that meets their terms of service, but they aren’t open to discuss what those terms are at this time,” a spokesperson for Oculus said.

So nay to the porn but a maybe to violence?

It is understandable that Oculus Rift head honchos would want to review the games and content that can be viewed on the headset.

One important reason would be for the health and safety of its consumers. Virtual reality might be a great and unique experience, but it’s also very immersive in a way that any experience might change a person’s disposition.

For instance, apps or games that throw sudden surprises might cause users with health problems to have a heart attack or to feel nauseated.

And according to the company’s CEO, Brendan Iribe, it’s why they “are going to monitor the content and make sure that it fits the policy we put up which is this safe and clean environment that everyone can know, and love, and trust just like other popular app stores.”

In other words, developer would have to get their programs approved first.

[Image via Wikimedia Commons]