Ryan Gosling A Replicant? Star In Talks To Play Opposite Harrison Ford In ‘Blade Runner’ Sequel

It’s official. Ryan Gosling is in negotiations to star in the Blade Runner sequel opposite Harrison Ford, Alcon Entertainment announced yesterday.

The studio, unfortunately, is keeping mum on Gosling’s character as well as the storyline. We do know the movie will take place decades after the end of the 1982 original Blade Runner, set in 2019 Los Angeles.

Ford will be reprising his original role of Rick Deckard, a police detective charged with hunting down and killing replicants, androids that are almost identical to humans.

Maybe Gosling will be an android hunter too, or perhaps he’ll be a replicant.

The Blade Runner sequel is scheduled to begin filming in the summer 2016 and will be directed by Denis Villeneuve, with Ridley Scott, director of Aliens, as executive producer.

The movie will be co-written by Hampton Fancher, who also co-wrote the original Blade Runner film, and Michael Green. The sequel is based on an idea by Fancher and Scott.

Gosling has two new movies coming out: Shane Black’s police thriller The Nice Guy, where he stars opposite Russell Crowe, and Terrence Malick’s musical drama Weightless. He’s currently shooting The Big Short, where he stars opposite Christian Bale, Brad Pitt, and Steve Carrell.

The original cult classic 1982 Blade Runner has been singled out as the best science fiction movie ever by many publications and was nominated for two academy awards.

Ryan Gosling Might Star In Blade Runner Sequel

In the movie, Harrison Ford’s character, Rick Deckard, begins the movie as a selfish self-involved cop who doesn’t see value in the lives of the androids he’s hired to hunt down.

As the movie progresses, Deckard grows sympathetic towards the replicants and especially one named Rachel, who he falls in love with.

A Director’s Cut and Final Cut release introduces new scenes, including a different ending, that suggest Deckard himself is a replicant.

The terms Blade Runner and replicant aren’t used in the original novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K. Dick, which was adapted for the big screen by Fancher and David Peoples.

Blade Runner was chosen in 1983 by the United States National Film Registry for preservation owing to its culture, historical, and aesthetical significance. The Visual Effects Society named it the second most influential movie of all time.

Alcon Entertainment bought the sequel, television, and franchise rights to Blade Runner in 2011 from Bud Yorkin and Cynthia Sike Yorkin, who will serve as producers for the movie’s sequel.

Alcon Entertainment is currently filming a remake of the moviePoint Break, according to the Los Angeles Times.