Drake’s New Mixtape Song ‘You & The 6’ Is Dedicated To His Mother, Emotional Track

Drake’s new 2015 mixtape, If You’re Reading This, You’re Too Late, has shocked the music community. Emotionally, he dedicated “You & The 6” to his mom, Sandi Graham.

This track makes you want to contact your own mother just to talk for a second. In the intro, Drake’s lyrics start by saying, “Having conversations with momma.”

Collage of Drake and His Mother, Sandi Graham
Credits: Tumblr
Collage of Drake and his mother, Sandi Graham.

Possibly, every man who has a similar type of relationship with his mother can relate to the closeness of that statement. Sometimes, individuals can become so overwhelmed with life that simple communications can become “placed on the backburner.” In the lyrics to follow, Drake mentions his mom having texted him, but he doesn’t respond.

“Man, my life is a mess. Ain’t been returning the texts. So, she’s been reading the press. She got Google Alerts. Them s**ts go straight to her phone. She worries about me from home. You know, she raised me alone.”

Drake and His Mother When He Was a Kid
Credits: Tumblr
Drake and his mother when he was a kid.

To quote Drake coming from a single-parent home, many American males understand and empathize in that situation. It’s an emotional construct that, often, further-strengthens the bond between mother and son. So, Drake’s “having conversations with momma” is a profound statement, even in its subtle entrance.

As his song continues, Drake’s mom — like many mothers who want to see their sons happy with a nice girl — hints to fix him up. If you’re a guy and you’ve had that type of mother, you can also relate to the circumstance. Drake’s lyrics state as follows.

“She [Sandi Graham] said, ‘I heard you’re back with you-know-who’. I told her, ‘Girl, you know I’m always back with you-know-who’. Yeah. And she’s like, ‘Who are we kidding? You’re 27. You’re just being you. You’re your father’s child. Man, thank God you’ve got some me in you.'”

Later, but on the same topic, Drake speaks as follows.

“And, look, I hate it when you hate on all my girlfriends and assistants — always convinced that there’s someone better. Like that girl from the gym who trains you. I know you wanna arrange it. You told me she’s free Thursday, and I’m sure that she’s an angel. But she don’t want this life. The timing ain’t right.

Maybe one day, but even one day when this is the time of her life, we do things that people pay to document. You got the sweetest heart, but I’m not here to give out compliments or boost nobody’s confidence, Momma.”

To reiterate, this Drake’s “You & The 6” hits home to a lot of men who come from similar homes and situations.

To digress for a second to Sandi’s proposed “you’re your father’s child” statement, many single-parent homes — where the fathers have walked out and left the family members to themselves — conduce an element where the son no longer strives to be like the father. Yet, somehow, the son — many times — ends up being like that which he strives so hard not to become.

Accordingly, there are several motivations behind attempting to be different. Men who have an insatiable desire to “keep going,” often do so because they don’t want to be like someone who quit earlier in their lives. Drake’s words just seem to bring a certain sentiment that’s almost nostalgic in deep-seeded essence. His lyrics go on to elaborate further.

“At least I always see it through. At least I’m always being true to what you taught me. Retired teacher, but your words still got me evolving.”

Likewise, every man has to be able to hold his own in this world — and the world can be a crazy place to survive. You can hear the sincerity in Drake’s voice as he continues speaking to his mother.

“I got no friends in this… I dont’ pretend with this… I don’t joke with this… I pull the knife out my back, and I cut their throats with it… I’m Game of Thrones with it… I’m Home Alone with it… I really hate using this tone with you… I really hate getting aggressive on this phone with you… I really hate wasting your time to check a clone or two… It’s just, they’re cloning me… Them n****s wanna-bes… It’s like… I’m the one they wanna be… I just… I can’t be out here being vulnerable… I mean, I kill’m every time they do a song with me… I sing the hooks, they sing along with me… What more [do] they want from me…”

Drake’s talking to his mother about being a man on his own — that, even though he’s her “baby,” he’s no longer a baby. It’s an emotional moment.

“But I just roll with it… Rolling ‘stone’ with it… Gotta be careful around Rolling Stone or anyone that’s trying to throw stones at me… I’m not condoning it… They will not tear nothing down, I built this home for you… No, I don’t call enough… I just been working with so little time for ‘personal’…”

Twitter Pic of Emotion from Drake's 'You And The 6' Lyrics
Credits: Twitter
This is the type of reaction and emotion Drake’s “You & The 6” song can bring from those who relate to it.

Drake’s ethnicity even has been teased and questioned.

“I used to get teased for being black, and now I’m here, and I’m ‘not black enough’. Cause I’m not acting tough or making stories up ’bout where I’m actually from.”

Yet, in hindsight respect, Drake tells her as follows.

“You and the Six raised me right. That s**t saved my life.”

For real, this particular writer is about to go call his mother like…

Drake's Instagram Photo
Credits: Instagram
One of Drake’s Instagram photos.

What do you think about Drake’s “You & The 6” song? Does it hit home for you? Does it stir up emotion for you?

[Feature Image via Tumblr]