Coke And Pepsi: Cola Makers Agree Their Beverages May Be Bad For You

Coke and Pepsi may be bad for you, and the public has secretly known this for probably decades. It was recently discovered that Coca-Cola and Pepsi Co. agree with the assessment, and they plan to do something about it. This sentiment is shared equally by Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, Inc. in a new agreement with the American Beverage Association and Alliance for a Healthier Generation.

There have been several instances of various popular beverages being proven unhealthy. Back at its inception, Coca-Cola’s drink was laced with actual cocaine. After health officials discovered this, they were forced to change their recipe and leave out what eventually became known as one of the most dangerous illegal drugs of all time. This resulted in several variations over the years, including Coca-Cola Classic and New Coke.

Other discoveries included the link between aspartame and cancer, as well as the use of chemicals deemed unsuitable for consumption in Mountain Dew. The caramel coloring was even changed after another link to cancer was discovered. This doesn’t even touch the fact that the sugar content in these beverages is potentially responsible for obesity in the United States.

Coke and Pepsi, along with Dr. Pepper, could see some changes in the way the products are sold. Among these changes include the posting of calorie information on soda fountains, vending machines, and retail coolers, as well as generally smaller portions. The aim is to reduce the U.S. obesity rate.

Could this mean the end of the two liter bottle? While it’s possible, it’s probably not likely. Few individual Americans consume an entire two liter bottle in one sitting. We will probably see smaller bottles being reduced in volume, possibly from the famous 20-ounce bottle to what appears to be the new standard of 16.9 ounces, or even 12 ounce cans.

New York already attempted a version of this by proposing a limit to the amount sold. Illinois tried to enact a tax on the drinks, with San Francisco working on the same tax. Apparently, no attempts so far have proven successful.

Susan K. Neely, president of the new initiative with the American Beverage Association, released the following statement about the new decision concerning Dr. Pepper, Coke, and Pepsi.

“This is the single-largest voluntary effort by an industry to help fight obesity and leverages our companies’ greatest strengths in marketing, innovation and distribution. This initiative will help transform the beverage landscape in America.”

By 2025, all beverage companies have agreed to reduce the calorie consumption of their drinks by 20 percent.

Reducing volume in retail cooler bottles or fountain drinks seems the most likely option, though if the price isn’t reduced as well, there could be outrage among consumers. A boycott is not likely, but could cut into profits and backfire on the companies involved.

It is unknown exactly how beverage companies like Coke and Pepsi plan to reduce consumption and curb the obesity rate, but they are working on it.

[image via Modern Cancer Treatments]