Seth Rogen, Judd Apatow Reluctantly Dragged Into #YesAllWomen Twitter Discussion

Actor Seth Rogen and frequent collaborator Judd Apatow were forced to join the #YesAllWomen conversation — stemming from a mass shooting in California Friday with a horrifying misogynist bent — after a newspaper columnist inexplicably attacked the pair for the content of their films in connection with the shooting.

There is a lot to unpack in relation to the tweets posted by Seth Rogen and Judd Apatow in response to a piece written by Ann Hornaday, following the Isla Vista incident and manifesto-writing virgin killer Elliot Rodger.

To begin, Rodger left a chilling manifesto raging at women for his virginity before a deadly and horrifying rampage Friday night — one for which many prior red flags were visible.

The #YesAllWomen hashtag became a part of the conversation early on, as feminists of both genders discussed what has been called “toxic masculinity” in the wake of the openly misogynistic murder spree.

But the Washington Post‘s Ann Hornaday took her commentary in a different direction, one that even without the commentary of Rogen and Apatow is upsetting and worrisome.

Hornaday lays some blame at the feet of the movie-making pair, lending credence to the idea Rodger’s rage was in part understandable… because Hollywood films depict Seth Rogen getting laid? As if he is some sort of otherwise unsexable manbeast?

She says:

“How many students watch outsized frat-boy fantasies like Neighbors and feel, as Rodger did, unjustly shut out of college life that should be full of ‘sex and fun and pleasure’? How many men, raised on a steady diet of Judd Apatow comedies in which the shlubby arrested adolescent always gets the girl, find that those happy endings constantly elude them and conclude, ‘It’s not fair?'”

The answer might be, “who cares? You still don’t get to kill people.” However, Rogen and Apatow both responded on Twitter about the article, with Rogen tweeting:

Apatow also joined the conversation about the murders, visibly frustrated at the unfair link between his films and Hollywood misogyny.

In some responses, he tweeted:

Then Apatow added:

Ann Hornaday has not commented on the response by Seth Rogen and Judd Apatow on her column. Do you think that her assessment was unfair?

[Image via Yahoo Movies]