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Nazi Gold: Music Score Could Be A Treasure Map

Nazi Gold Cache Hidden In Bavaria, Clues In Sheet Music Say

Is the location of Nazi gold treasure, thought lost for decades, hidden in a forgotten piece of sheet music? A Dutch filmmaker believes this is exactly the case and has taken his shovel to a town in Bavaria. Referencing sheet music with mysterious annotations made by Hitler’s aide, Martin Bormann, Leon Geisen hopes that a long-lost cache of valuables could soon be found.

The theory of the hidden Nazi treasure points to a lost collection of at least 100 gold bars and Hitler’s personal diamond collection, known as the “Tears of the Wolf.” In the late days of the Second World War, Hitler wanted to share the cache’s location with Nazi party accountant Franz Xaver Schwarz in Munich. This was supposedly transmitted in secret with sheet music. The sheets, however, failed to reach Schwarz before being arrested.

Last year Dutch writer Karl Hammer Kaatee began publishing scanned images of old sheet music. While the music, Gottfried Federlein’s Marsch-Impromptu, is not terribly remarkable, notes and scribblings on the music’s sheets made by Bormann interested Kaatee, reports The Guardian. Using these published scans, filmmaker Leon Geisen believes he has found clues leading to the infamous Nazi treasure, hidden in the Bavarian town of Mittenwald.

What clues does Geisen think will lead him to the Nazi gold? One line, handwritten by Bormann, reads “Wo Matthias die Saiten Streichelt,” which translates to “Where Matthew plucks strings.” Geisen says famed violin-maker Matthias Klotz is referenced here, one of Mittenwald’s best known residents decades ago. As ABC News reports, another clue Geisen points to is the written phrase “Enden der Tanz,” or “End the dance” — possibly a reference to a local railway buffer stop.

Nazi Gold Clues Hidden In Sheet Music

Geisen has dug in one location in Mittenwald. While he hasn’t found the treasure yet, he did come across a great deal of strange metals, an apparent geological anomaly for the area. Geisen plans to dig at several more sites, but hopes to raise the money through online crowdfunding. He also says he wishes to make a documentary film about his hunt for the hidden Nazi gold treasure.

[Featured Image via ShutterStock; Body Image via Karl Hammer Kaatee / The Guardian]

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