Posted in: Opinion

Most Annoying Words Or Phrases of 2012 Supersized

Marist Institute for Public Opinion Hancock Center

The trite phrases that people tend to rely on in day-to-day conversation can get shopworn.

In the annual Marist College poll, “whatever” tops the list for the fourth consecutive year of the most annoying word or phrase used in conversation as The Inquisitr has previously reported.

In order, the survey found the most annoying words/phrases for 2012 are as follows: “whatever,” like,” “you know,” “just sayin,” “Twitterverse, “gotcha,” and “unsure.”

With all due respect (which is another phrase that could make the list), the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion telephone survey of about 1,000 adults seems to be a little incomplete and therefore not as “awesome” or “amazing” as it could be.

The Inquisitr, therefore, would like to offer the following additional annoying or overused words/phrases for your consideration:

  • “to be honest with you” or “honestly” [big red flag in terms of veracity]
  • “I ain’t gonna lie” [ditto]
  • “I mean” [at beginning of sentence]
  • “no problem” [when used instead of "you're welcome"]
  • “basically”
  • “bring it” or “game on”
  • “step up your/my game”
  • “absolutely” [instead of just saying "yes"]
  • “singing Kumbaya”
  • “at the end of the day”
  • “it is what it is”
  • “throwing [someone] under the bus”
  • “how ya doin'”
  • “I have your back” or “you have my back” etc.
  • “I don’t have a dog in this fight”

Dishonorable mention:

While we’re at it, maybe at the same time we can rid ourselves of a way of speaking that is called uptalk (a.k.a. “high rising terminal”). This is the very annoying tendency for a speaker to end a declarative sentence as if it is a question. This apparently started with the “Valley Girls” back in the day but has spread across the country and all demographic groups like a virus.

Even though some of these words or phrases do fit a given situation, we should probably put “back in the day” on the list too.

What words or phrases get on your nerves the most?

[Image credit: Amst94]

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