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Flickr Offers Up Three Months Of Premium Service For Free

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Are you unhappy with the way Instagram has been doing business as of late? The popular service’s photo-sharing competitor is giving you an opportunity to use its service for free.

In the wake of the headache Instagram caused its countless users earlier this week, Flickr is now giving away three free months of its premium service for absolutely free. Many feel this is being done to lure disgruntled photographers away from the popular mobile app.

According to CNET, Flickr’s Pro service will only set you back around $25 dollars per year. However, those who don’t want to take the plunge without getting their feet wet first will be able to do so without any expense on their part.

In an effort to give established members a taste of this generous offer, Flickr is pushing back the subscription payment date by three months.

Gizmodo explains that Instagram expats will be able to enjoy three free months of the premium service only if they sign up before January 4. After that, it would appear you’re out of luck. You’ll just have to take everyone else’s word that Flickr is the way to go.

Given the amount of controversy Instagram stirred up by announcing they could modify and use anyone’s photo for advertising purposes, it’s not surprising that Flickr is attempting to lure disgruntled users away from the app.

Even if Flickr only manages to lure a small fraction of disgruntled Instagram users away from the app, the company stands to make a significant chunk of change. Revenue tends to generate quickly when you have a ton of people signing up for $25 a pop.

According to The Economist, Yahoo! and Flickr could use this situation to their advantage. Since the photo-sharing company has reportedly struggled a bit since being acquired by Yahoo! in 2005, the site is looking to entice new users who feel they’ve been burned by Instagram.

What do you think about Flickr’s free trial offer? Are you planning to abandon Instagram in the wake of the advertising controversy?

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