nokia 3310 nostalgia

The Nokia 3310 Will Give You Seriously Nostalgia Vibes

The Nokia 3310 is perfect for those who are sick of smartphones. Maybe you’re feeling a little nostalgic lately. Or, maybe you’re sick of messing up your text messages and emails whenever tapping your touch screen. Instead of introducing the latest and greatest smartphone, Nokia is selling nostalgia. More and more people are getting addicted to their smartphones. It’s easy to access your emails, social media, music, movies, TV shows, and other things.

When cell phones first came, it was mostly used for making calls. Some phones allowed you to send and receive text messages if you were lucky. And if you owned a phone, then it was most likely a Nokia 3310, which included a few games. It was heavy duty and it lasted for several days on a single charge. It was the best phone at the time. The Nokia 3310 has made a comeback, according to Bloomberg Quint. Unfortunately, it’s available in some parts of the world.

The company says the phone can last for nearly 25 days on a single charge. It comes with an updated version of the game “Snake,” which is what made the Nokia 2210 iconic. The phone is not as tough as the first one. It doesn’t feel like a brick in your hand. In fact, it’s smaller, lighter, and slimmer to hold. It also comes equipped with a 2.4-inch curved window QVGA display. The phone was relaunched by HMD Global, a Finnish startup tech company, with an exclusive license under the Nokia brand.

nokia 3310 phone
[Image by David Ramos/Getty Images]

Here are the specifications for the new Nokia 3310, as provided by the manufacturer:

• System: Dual band 900/1800 MHz

• Available in dual-SIM variant (microSIM)

• Software platform: Nokia Series 30+

• Dimensions: 115.6 x 51.0 x 12.8mm

• Weight: 79.6 g (including battery)

• Display: 2.4” curved window color QVGA (240*320)

• Connectivity: micro USB, 3.5mm AV connector

Bluetooth 3.0 with SLAM

• Camera: 2Mpxl camera with LED flash

• MicroSD card support up to 32GB*

• LED torchlight

Operating times

• Standby time: up to 25.3 days**

• Talk time: up to 22.1 hours**

• MP3 playback up to 51.0 hours

• FM radio playback up to 39.0 hours

The Nokia 3310 also comes with a dual sim slot, MicroSIM, and it supports the 2G network. Don’t look to surf the Web with this phone though. It doesn’t come with Wi-Fi support. Though it comes pre-loaded with the Opera Browser, you won’t be able to look at apps. That doesn’t mean you can’t browse through Facebook, YouTube, Snapchat, or Instagram.

So, who would purchase the Nokia 3310? Those with a smartphone addiction, according to a Forbes report.

“Finding success in western markets is a difficult task for the Nokia 3310. It’s here that the nostalgia card will be heavily played. For those who want ‘just a phone’ there’s a good argument for a phone like the Nokia 3310. If you’re going out to a multi-day outdoor music festival, on a camping trip, a long drive, and you need to have something utterly reliable that is focused on making phone calls, then you need a different mix of software and hardware to devices like the Android-powered Nokia 3.”

Leonid Berkshidsky of BloombergView said he might ditch his smartphone for a Nokia 3310. He admits that he’s found himself addicted to his phone.

“I’m no longer 24, but I fear I check my phone at least twice an hour when I don’t have access to a computer. It’s a useless habit; most people who message me would wait a few hours, and so would the column ideas I get from the social networks, the news, academic research and other people’s writings.”

However, mobile users in India and Africa don’t seem to care about nostalgia. They want something that has a long battery life, easy functions, and something that’s sturdy. That’s something the new Nokia 3310 can’t offer these days.

white nokia 3310 phone
[Image by David Ramos/Getty Images]

Nokia isn’t hoping to break sales records with this phone. It’s about drawing attention to the company’s first line of less expensive phones that don’t come equipped with the Android OS but are also marketed under the Nokia brand.

[Featured Image by David Ramos/Getty Images]

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