Donald Trump, NPR, PBS

Donald Trump Plans To Ax NPR, PBS Funding As Part Of Massive Government Spending Reduction

President Donald Trump has identified the funding sources for National Public Radio (NPR) and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) as part of his massive government spending budget cuts, according to multiple media reports this week.

The Hill blog reported on proposed budget cuts being considered by Donald Trump prior to his inauguration, listing the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) as two of the multiple government agencies being considered for elimination. According to an unnamed source, a portion of the budget cuts being floated by the Donald Trump administration fund the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), a funding source for both the NPR and PBS entities.

“The Corporation for Public Broadcasting would be privatized, while the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities would be eliminated entirely. Overall, the blueprint being used by Trump’s team would reduce federal spending by $10.5 trillion over 10 years.”

The funding sources for NPR and PBS comprise roughly 0.02 percent of the $3.9 trillion budget, according to one estimate. The Donald Trump administration is seeking to cut the $445 million provided to the CPB as well as the roughly $250 million paid out to the NEA and NEH annually, the report noted.

Variety reported that the funding sources for the NPR and PBS have long been in the crosshairs of Republican administrations, and Donald Trump is proving his administration will not be different. In an effort to rebuke President Donald Trump and his proposed budget cuts, the CPB issued a statement in support of the funding sources behind both NPR and PBS.

“The federal investment in public media is vital seed money — especially for stations located in rural America, and those serving underserved populations where the appropriation counts for 40-50% of their budget. The loss of this seed money would have a devastating effect. These stations would have to raise approximately 200% more in private donations to replace the federal investment. Moreover, the entire public media service would be severely debilitated.”

NPR is funded through a variety of sources, according to the organization’s revenue resource breakdown. Member stations receive only about 16 percent of their overall funding from the CPB, or a federal, state or local government entity. While nearly two out of every three dollars comes from private donations made by organizations or individuals, the government revenue stream Donald Trump has suggested should be eliminated is also important to individual member’s health, according to the organization’s website.

“The loss of federal funding would undermine the stations’ ability to pay NPR for programming, thereby weakening the institution. Elimination of federal funding would result in fewer programs, less journalism — especially local journalism — and eventually the loss of public radio stations, particularly in rural and economically distressed communities.”

Like their brethren, PBS relies on a variety of funding sources to keep their member stations afloat. In addition to the CPB, the organization’s website identified government agencies and donations from corporations, foundations, and individuals as other funding resources for PBS. The website also directly identifies the NEA and NEH as part of its revenue stream.

In addition to the NPR and PBS federal government assistance being axed, Donald Trump has also identified other areas of spending the new administration will target for spending cuts, according to The Hill. The departments of Commerce, Energy, Transportation, Justice, and State would see significant cuts and program eliminations under a plan being touted by President Donald Trump.

Do you believe that Donald Trump will push Congress to eliminate funding for PBS and NPR under his administration? Be sure to follow the Inquisitr for more on this developing story.

[Featured Image by Pool/Getty Images]

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