Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Attack Speech Live Stream

Watch Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Attack Speech Live Stream: Will Reel Off Accusations Against Democratic Nominee

Donald Trump plans to deliver what he calls “a major speech” devoted to attacking Hillary Clinton, and now the speech is scheduled to stream live from Manchester, New Hampshire, on Monday as he attempts to respond to some serious body blows landed by Clinton that have seemingly given the first woman to become a major party nominee an advantage over Trump as the general election campaign begins.

On June 3, Clinton delivered a speech in San Diego which despite being billed as a “major foreign policy address” quickly turned into a full-scale deconstruction of Donald Trump.

“He’s not just unprepared, he’s temperamentally unfit to hold an office that requires knowledge, stability and immense responsibility,” Clinton said in the speech

Trump called the Clinton speech “pathetic.”

But the speech appears to have bothered Trump, because he will now deliver his own speech attacking Clinton, though according to early reports and statements by Trump himself, the accusations Trump plans to level against the former secretary of state will be familiar to most voters already.

In a speech on Tuesday night, following his victories in California and several other states to close out the primary campaign season, Trump offered a preview of his Monday speech.

“The Clintons have turned the politics of personal enrichment into an art form for themselves,” Trump claimed. “They’ve made hundreds of millions of dollars selling access, selling favors, selling government contracts. … Secretary Clinton even did all of the work on a totally illegal private server … and the corrupt system is totally protecting her.”

Watch a full replay of the Donald Trump election night speech, including his full preview of his Hillary Clinton attack speech in the video below.

To watch a live stream of the Donald Trump speech in which he plans to level a string of accusations against Hillary Clinton, click on the following video. Trump is scheduled to take the podium at 2:30 p.m. Eastern Time, 11:30 a.m. Pacific, on Monday, June 13, at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics Auditorium on the campus of Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Though the speech will stream live online, the crowd will not consist of the Trump supporters who often fill his large rallies. Instead, Trump will deliver his remarks to a select, invited audience.

Republicans are worried, however, that the Trump speech will be viewed by all but his devoted supporters as not credible.

“He can’t give a ‘four Pinocchios’ tin-foil hat speech,” Bruce Haynes, a party strategist, told the online magazine Politico. “If he’s going to disqualify her, the evidence that supports his case has to be legitimate. It can’t be the musings, whims and wannabes of the conspiracy illuminati.”

According to Politico, the Trump speech accusations will include what a Trump aide says is “epic corruption” in the Clinton Foundation, a charity founded by Clinton’s husband, former President Bill Clinton.

But the Clinton Foundation has received a rating of “A” from the independent monitoring group Charity Watch, and donated 88 percent of its budget to charitable programs, with only 12 percent going to overhead involved in operating the foundation.


MORE DONALD TRUMP COVERAGE FROM THE INQUISITR:


Donald Trump needs to make a major impact with the speech in order to overcome a significant disadvantage in the polls at the start of the general election campaign.

According to election forecaster Harry Enten of the site FiveThirtyEight.com, since Trump vanquished his final two Republican rivals in early May and became the presumptive nominee, there have been 39 polls taken, pitting Trump head-to-head against Clinton. Only three of those polls have shown Trump in the lead.

Clinton has led Donald Trump by an average of three percentage points in those polls, a lead Enten calls “statistically significant,” given that the polls have covered more than 100,000 individual voter interviews.

[Featured Photo By Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images]

Comments