D.C. Madam's Former Lawyer

D.C. Madam’s Former Lawyer: Records Already Online And ‘Very Relevant’ To 2016 Election

Montgomery Blair Sibley, the former lawyer of the infamous, late “D.C. madam,” Deborah Palfrey, says that the records of his former client’s call logs are already online. The D.C. madam’s former lawyer threatened earlier this week to release Palfrey’s call logs, saying that the information he has at his disposal is “very relevant” to the 2016 U.S. presidential election. According to Sibley, the digitized records will be publicly released if he fails to reset a 72-hour “countdown clock.”

According to a U.S. News and World Report bombshell, the D.C. madam’s former lawyer has issued a two-week ultimatum to federal courts. The lawyer wants them to at least consider lifting a gag order that’s been in place since 2007 and which pertains to the D.C. madam’s records. According to the report, the madam’s former lawyer may deem the order void if the federal courts refuse.

DC Madam Former Lawyer
[Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images]
Sibley says that the 72-hour countdown clock is a safeguard. The lawyer says that he set up the system so that if he disappears, the records will be published anyway. He went on to say that he hopes that the 72-hour countdown system he’s created will, perhaps, protect him against “violent acts” at the hands of those who want to silence him, or their agents.

The former lawyer of the notorious D.C. madam said that he’s stored the hyped records on four servers at various locations around the world, and that if he doesn’t manually reset the clock at least every 72 hours, dozens of reporters the world over will receive a website link. According to Sibley, the lawyer uploaded the digitized information back in January. That was when, according to the D.C. madam’s former lawyer, he decided to go forward with his very public claim that the records in his possession are highly relevant to the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

“There’s a link right now, that if you had, you would have access to the records. If I die, disappear, whatever, they will be out.”

The D.C. madam’s former lawyer reportedly said, without being prompted, that he won’t answer questions about whether or not he is partnering with WikiLeaks. Back in 2010, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange did something quite similar when he created an encrypted “insurance” file.

Sibley says that the website protected by the 72-hour countdown clock hosts a virtual treasure trove of potentially incriminating information. Included among the information stockpiled by the D.C. madam’s former lawyer are PDF files of call logs containing roughly 5,000 phone numbers, as well as corresponding spreadsheets that include the names and physical addresses of 815 Verizon Wireless customers associated with those phone numbers. Sibley obtained possession of the sensitive and potentially campaign-ending information when he defended the D.C. madam in court.

The D.C. madam was arrested in 2006 on charges connected to an escort service she ran; an escort service that was reportedly frequented and very popular among the Washington D.C. elite. The lawyer released 10,000 phone numbers in the form of call logs back in 2007. The information dump resulted in some serious political consequences for the D.C. madam’s clientele, including Sen. David Vitter from Louisiana. According to the D.C. madam’s former lawyer, he withheld an additional 5,000 phone numbers that were to be released during the trial, but he was fired by Palfrey before her conviction.

Madam Outside Court
[Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images]
The fact that he was fired is a “major hurdle” for the lawyer in his bid to modify the gag order related to the records he has threatened to make public. In January, U.S. District Court Judge Richard Roberts refused to accept the D.C. madam’s former lawyer’s motion requesting reconsidering of the restraining order on those grounds.

“Why Sibley would have possession of subpoenaed records in a case from which he has been terminated and why he would not instead have turned all copies of them over to the defendant’s continuing counsel of record is not set forth in the motion.”

According to the lawyer, he delivered original copies of all records to Preston Burton, the lawyer who replaced him at the D.C. madam’s trial. Thus far, Burton has refused to respond to queries about the records in question. Sibley told the press that he no longer has physical copies of the potentially damning records, rather just the digital copies with their 72-hour trigger.

The D.C. madam’s former lawyer says that he hasn’t heard back from the D.C. federal appeals court nor the Supreme Court regarding whether or not they will consider lifting the gag order pertaining to the records. On Monday, March 28, Sibley said he would wait two weeks to hear from the courts before releasing the information at his disposal. Now, however, the lawyer is changing his tune. Sibley now reportedly says that due to the fluidity of the situation, the timeline for releasing the documents may change.

Sibley must go through the courts to have the gag order surrounding the D.C. madam’s phone records lifted if he wants to release the information legally. Palfrey herself is deceased, and therefore cannot weigh in on the controversy. Just two weeks after being convicted on a plethora of charges related to her escort service, the D.C. madam was found dead in her mother’s shed, hanging with a rope around her neck. The cause of death was officially ruled a suicide, but there was speculation by many, including North Star Report, that the D.C. madam was killed because she knew too much about too many high-ranking clients.

Her death most likely contributed to her former lawyer’s decision to protect his information with a 72-hour tripwire.

While he has gone on the record as saying that the information contained in his records could impact the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the D.C. madam’s former lawyer has not confirmed whether or not it relates to one or more of the final five presidential primary candidates.

[Photo by Jacquelyn Martin/AP Images]

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