CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 19:  Fans show their support for Breast Cancer Awareness on October 19, 2015 during the game between the Cleveland Cavaliers and the Dallas Mavericks at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2015 NBAE  (Photo by David Liam Kyle/NBAE via Getty Images)

Breast Cancer Awareness Is Taken To New Heights By Deadpool And Topless Brazilians

Breast cancer awareness is a cause worth recognizing any time of the year. According to the CDC, breast cancer is still one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. Contrary to popular belief, breast cancer is also possible in men and is something that must be taken seriously by both sexes. The CDC estimates that in 2012, approximately 224,147 women and 2,125 men were diagnosed with breast cancer.

Breast cancer has long been a popular social cause in the United States, but as of late, breast cancer awareness has taken new shape as some people find unique ways to bring attention to the cause. The comic book character Deadpool as well as a group of topless Brazilian women have recently tackled the cause.

According to ComicBook, Deadpool, whose good taste and common courtesy is questionable to begin with, has now taken on the women’s health issue. The first Deadpool trailer played on the line, “I’m touching myself tonight,” and the breast cancer awareness piece is a followup to that. In the video, Deadpool encourages viewers to touch themselves for breast cancer awareness and then goes into an instructional video on breast cancer detection. The Deadpool breast cancer awareness video can be viewed below.

And Deadpool isn’t the only one taking on breast cancer awareness in an unconventional way. According to Latinos Health, Brazilian women are taking on the women’s health issue by encouraging women to go topless on Ipanema beach, coining it the Topless in Rio project.

Unlike in the United States, breast cancer awareness is still a taboo subject in Brazil, despite being the number one cancer-related death in Latino women. A group of women have challenged local laws to bring awareness to the breast cancer topic, and approximately a dozen women went topless on Ipanema beach on January 24, 2016, to show their support for breast cancer awareness.

Topless in Rio project founder Ana Paula Nogueira said, “The idea behind going bare is to lay bare a series of other issues, other prejudices. We use going topless to draw attention to matters that people should really be concerned about.”

Topless sunbathing is illegal in Brazil, and the breast cancer awareness demonstrators could be jailed for three months up to one year for going topless on the beach.

Meanwhile, breast cancer supporters in the United States are continuing to show their support for breast cancer awareness through more traditional displays. For example, in Arizona, a pink-trimmed police car has just been added to the department, as a show of support for breast cancer awareness. The new police car is in partnership with Arizona Oncology.

According to AZ Family, the patrol vehicle is all black with a pink grill and pink logos. The vehicle will be used by police to conduct business as usual.

The Flagstaff Police Department said on their Facebook page, “The Flagstaff community and the Flagstaff Police Department have all been affected by this disease and by collaborating with Arizona Oncology we would like to bring attention and awareness to our community.”

The official breast cancer awareness month may not be until October, but considering one in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their life, it’s a cause worth supporting all year long. What interesting or creative ways have you seen others showing their support for breast cancer awareness?

Breast cancer awareness efforts
Breast cancer awareness efforts

[Photo credits: Latinos Health & Getty Image]