Anti-Islam rallies

Anti-Islam Rallies Pale In Comparison To Nation Of Islam’s ‘Justice Or Else!’

The anti-Islam rallies planned for the weekend were mostly non-events that attracted few protestors to mosques mapped out by “Global Rally for Humanity” on Google. In contrast, the “Justice or Else!” demonstration organized by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan at the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, October 10, 2015, drew a sizeable crowd, conservatively estimated at 400,000.

According to the New York Times, the National Mall rally, a toned-down version of 1995’s “Million Man March” organized by Farrakhan for black males, had women and children, as well as Latinos and Native Americans in attendance. The inclusive air of the latest gathering was highlighted by Farrakhan’s speech exhorting people to love themselves more, women to be cautious of abortion, blacks to stop killing each other, and the government to have a closer look at policemen killing unarmed blacks.

International Business Times rated the march as widely successful with the Reverend Jesse Jackson, Sr. and former NAACP Chairman Ben Chavis among the featured speakers. Distancing themselves from the event were several black Christian civil rights leaders and Jewish American leaders because of Farrakhan’s anti-Semitic and racist views. The black women almost entirely left out of the program, came anyway on buses to support the men, according to insiders.

For Friday and Saturday, the Global Rally for Humanity had scheduled a series of events to protest Islam, targeting mosques, community center,s and government offices.

According to Newsweek, rally organizers stated the point they wanted to drive across on their Facebook page.

“Standing up against Islam does not mean you’re a racist or a bigot, it simply means you’re not an idiot and can see the reality of Islam around the world. The world is saying no to Islam.”

Security concerns were raised by numerous mosques on the target list of the anti-Islam rallies being organized via social media. But as it turned out, participation was in paltry numbers and no untoward incidents were reported to local authorities in the cities where anti-Islam rallies took place.

New York City organizers encouraged demonstrators to show up at mosques in all five boroughs. In Dearborn, Michigan, anti-Islam protesters were asked to bring their weapons for the “open carry, anti-mosque, pro-America” rallies.

In March of 2015, Farrakhan delivered his Saviour’s Day address in Chicago, the Washington Times reported, wherein he accused “Zionist Jews” of playing key roles in the September 11, 2001, terror attacks that left nearly 3,000 people dead. Insisting that Israelis were arrested after the attack and released, he made the following allegation.

“We know that an Israeli film crew dressed as Arabs were filming the Twin Towers before the first plane went in. In other words, these Israelis had full knowledge of the attacks.”

Like other Islamist spokespersons featured in mainstream media, Farrakhan has been accused of using the method of taqiyya when dealing with unbelievers. In the Quran, Mohammed allows Muslims to lie to unbelievers in order to defeat them. The two forms of justified lying are: taqiyya or saying something that isn’t true, and kitman or lying by omission.

For example, faithful Muslim warrior Yasser Arafat convinced the West he believed in a peace process with Israel, while at the same time, issuing a call in Arabic for a million martyrs to march on Jerusalem to destroy Israel and create their “Palestine…from the river to the sea.” The second Oslo Accord that Arafat signed with Israel was on September 28, 1995, and the Million Man March in the United States occurred right after that on October 16, 1995.

GOP candidate Ben Carson, in his anti-Islam rhetoric, defines taqiyya as doublespeak, one version for the ears of believers, another version for the ears of unbelievers. In winning their nuclear deal, Iranian negotiators would have felt fully entitled to use taqiyya, like any good Muslim speaking at open rallies.

[Photo by Allison Shelley/Getty Images]

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