Canine Liberace? Dog plays piano and sings.

Canine Liberace? Watch Talented Dog Play Piano And Sing Along [Video]

It has been close to 30 years since the most renowned piano player of all time, Wladziu Valentino Liberace, passed away. Don’t tell that to this schnoodle named Tucker, though. It seems that the adorable dog can’t wait for its owners to hit the mall so it can tickle the ivories of the family piano and belt out improvised vocals in a seeming show of homage to the master pianist.

Watch the piano playing pooch in action, as it performs its rendition of Liberace’s “I’ll Be Seeing You,” in the video below.

Of course, this lovable dog isn’t really playing Liberace’s music, and there is no way it was even alive during the beloved artist’s lifetime. However, the dog does indeed seem to realize that hitting the keys creates sound and looks to be having the time of his life.

Liberace was revered for his incredible piano playing mostly through his television show The Liberace Show, which was enjoyed by 35 million viewers, according to reports from the New York Daily News. Even before his death, the name Liberace had become synonymous with “piano virtuoso.”

Watch Liberace wow his fans with George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue,” a song that many readers will likely recognize, from its use in commercials and films, but may not be familiar with its origins.

Besides his incredible piano playing and style, Liberace also has the unfortunate distinction of being one of the first recognized celebrities to succumb to AIDS. During his lifetime, he denied that he was infected with the virus, but after his death, coroners confirmed that the mega-personality had died from pneumonia related to AIDS.

Liberace was remembered recently along with 12 other talented artists and sports figures who suffered and perished at the hands of the life-wasting disease, marking what would have been the 69th birthday of Freddie Mercury, a talented piano player in his own right, yesterday.

The Queen frontman was known to be openly bisexual and was a member of a generation that was at least partially open to such admissions. Liberace and Rock Hudson, who was seen by many as the first bona fide star to die from AIDS, did not enjoy the same freedom and lived in a time where household name artists and musicians could not afford to make such public revelations. The Huffington Post reported on Hudson’s secret, which was closely guarded by friends right up until 1985, when he tragically passed.

Even though he is oblivious to the fact, the likable dog playing piano, accompanied with its delightful attempt at singing, pays tribute to all the musical greats that have come before him. There is little doubt that Liberace, Mercury, Hudson, or anyone else could help but smile at the effort he puts forth.

[Screenshot Courtesy Dmax/YouTube]

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