First Hooters, Now Shooters: Waitresses At Colorado Eatery All Pack Heat
shooters grill

First Hooters, Now Shooters: Waitresses At Colorado Eatery All Pack Heat

Back in the 80s, Hooters restaurants became famous around America, and not just for the great burgers, but because all the waitresses were “well-endowed” in the breast area and wore tiny t-shirts with the restaurant’s logo proudly displayed in “3D.”

But times have changed and Hooters isn’t doing so well, as that kind of objectification of women has become a little politically incorrect with the passage of time.

But now there’s Shooters, a fantastic Colorado grill restaurant which employs waitresses who all pack heat, in the form of unconcealed handguns strapped in their holsters.

And c’mon guys, who agrees that a woman with a weapon is way sexier than any amount of tight t-shirt Hooters girls?

On arrival at Shooters, one is under no illusion as to what kind of place it is, as a sign prominently displayed on the front door proclaims, “Guns are welcome on premises. Please keep all weapons holstered, unless the need arises. In such cases, judicious marksmanship is appreciated.”

The Carlyle Observer reports that, according to Shooters owner Lauren Boebert, the restaurant is simply allowing customers and employees to exercise their constitutional right to bear arms.

“We encourage it, and the customers love that they can come here and express their rights. This country was founded on our freedom. People can come in carrying their gun, and they can pray over their food,” said Boebert.

Meanwhile, Freepress reported that Boebert specifically chose the restaurant’s name as a tribute to its liberal policy on guns.

“I consulted with my Christian friends and everyone said ‘Shooters’ sounded like a bar or a strip joint. But I thought, this is Rifle — it was founded around guns and the Old West. We called it Shooters and started throwing guns and Jesus all over the place.”

As well offering tasty American and Mexican food, Shooters also offers customers concealed carry training courses, which qualifies people for Colorado and Utah permits. A single session costs $75, including dinner, but the eatery — understandably– does not serve alcohol.

Comments