A Real-Life Exorcist Says Celine Dion’s Clothing Line Celinununu Is ‘Demonic’ For Being Gender-Neutral

'I don’t even know how many genders there’s supposed to be now, but there are only two that God made.'

celine dion
Dimitrios Kambouris / Getty Images

'I don’t even know how many genders there’s supposed to be now, but there are only two that God made.'

Celine Dion’s new clothing line of gender-neutral children’s clothes, some of which feature patterns of stars and skulls, are so offensive as to literally be the work of the Devil, says a real-life exorcist.

As Yahoo News reports, the Canadian singer, like so many other celebrities, has started a clothing line. However, Celinununu is not intended for adults, but for babies and children. And unlike so many lines of baby clothes, which feature separate colors, shapes, and graphics for boys or girls, Celine’s line eschews all that in favor of clothes intended for either sex.

And it comes from a place of wanting parents to parent their children with gender-neutrality in mind, not just in clothing choices but in all things.

“People, and for that matter – little humans, express themselves through clothes. We would like to enable them to be who they are, so that their choices are driven by their own true essence and free spirit, beyond stereotypes or any norm.”

But between the maker’s advocacy for gender equality and the apparent symbolism on the garments, some have concluded that Celine’s fashion line is less about cute clothes and more about the work of the Devil.

Monsignor John Esseff, who is a real-life exorcist (having conducted them over a 40-year career), says that the clothes are downright “demonic.”

“The devil is going after children by confusing gender. To say that there is no difference [in gender] is satanic.”

It’s not just Monsignor Esseff. Over on YouTube, where the clothing line’s commercial symbolizes the breaking down of the barrier between the sexes, the comments section is blowing up with allegations of devilry.

“BOYCOTT ALL THESE DEMONIC HOLLYWOOD HYPOCRITES!!!!”

It’s not just the gender-neutrality that is raising eyebrows. It’s the words and symbolism on them. Some internet users, for example, have taken exception to the skulls on some of the garments. Others don’t like the eyes, supposedly symbols of the Devil or of pagan religious traditions. Others don’t care for the stars.

Of course, Celinununu is hardly the only kids’ clothing line to eschew gender stereotypes and offer gender-neutral options. As Huffington Post reported in 2015, at least a dozen manufacturers were at the time offering clothes beyond the traditional this-for-boys, that-for-girls business model.

Similarly, stars and skulls and eyes, while they may raise aesthetic considerations when it comes to children’s clothes, aren’t necessarily harbingers of deeper meaning. As Yahoo News writer Hope Schreiber notes, Celinununu appears to be going for minimalism over Satanism (“if anything, Dion is encouraging our children to be goth”).