Woolsey Fire Inspires Vagrant Records’ Rich Egan To Create ‘I Believe In California’ Shirt To Benefit Victimss

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Rich Egan, the co-founder of rock music label Vagrant Records, is currently selling T-shirts and posters to raise money for those who have been affected by the deadly wildfires, frequently known as the Woolsey Fire, moving through Southern California. All profits from the merchandise, which bears the phrase “I believe in California,” will be given to organizations aiding victims in the affected areas.

Egan, a native of Southern California, decided he wanted to help the cause after watching footage of the fires last week, according to Billboard. He quickly designed a black shirt, along with a matching 12 x 18 silkscreened poster, featuring a bear over the state of California and a cluster of pine trees with gray, ash-like edges. The shirt is now available for $20 on ibelieveincalifornia.com.

In a statement about his fundraiser, Egan said that he believes in putting what you stand for on a t-shirt because it’s “simple, powerful, and to the point.”

“Punk rock has taught me a lot. Mainly, you don’t wait for other people to do things for you. You do it,” Egan said. “I wanted shirts that capture the nature of what’s happened. That represent being down, but not out. We are all still standing, and we’re going to help each other get through it.”

The Woolsey Fire has so far taken 31 lives, destroyed 6,700 structures, and led 250,000 people to evacuate their homes. Many homes have burned down, including ones owned by Miley Cyrus, Gerard Butler, and Neil Young. The wildfire is expected to continue rapidly with increased winds, according to a recent story by the Inquisitr. Local firefighters are devoting their energy to contain the fires.

Egan also co-owns Nashville’s Hard 8 Working Group artist management firm. Earlier this year, the company released “I believe in Heroism” T-shirts to support victims of the Nashville Waffle House shooting.

Travis Reinking, 29, opened fire with an assault rifle and killed four people at a Waffle House in Antioch in April, according to CNN. A customer, James Shaw Jr., was then able to wrestle the gun away from the shooter. Despite his action, Shaw stated that he never wanted to be called a hero.

Hard 8 Working Group’s red, white, and blue t-shirt featured an image of Shaw’s injured hand in the center. Their design was a variation of the classic “I love Nashville” design. The shirts were sold by Brantley Gilbert (one of Hard 8 Working Group’s artists) and Dashboard Confessional at their concerts, as well as ibelieveinnashville.com, according to WDEZ.