Rodney King Was On PCP, Coke, And Booze At Time Of His Death [Toxicology Report]

James Johnson - Author
By

Jun. 15 2013, Updated 8:51 p.m. ET

Rodney King was in a “state of drug and alcohol induced delirium” when he passed away, according to the official toxicology report released by his cases supervising coroner.

The report from the San Bernardino Coroners office further notes:

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“The effects of the drugs and alcohol, combined with [King’s preexisting heart condition] probably precipitated a cardiac arrhythmia and [King], thus incapacitated, was unable to save himself and drowned.”

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When Rodney King was found, he was laying naked, face down in the deep end of his pool.

According to the report, Rodney King was under the influence of various substances including PCP, cocaine, marijuana, and alcohol.

While the cause of death is still listed as a drowning accident, the drugs found in Rodney King’s body have been listed as “contributing factors” in his death.

You may recall that during his 1991 beating and arrest, there were rumors that police beat King to the ground after they experienced his “super human strength,” which they believed at the time was a result of PCP consumption. That theory was soon invalidated by a negative drug test, results that will likely raise some eyebrows given the new toxicology report.

Rodney King’s fiance found his body floating in his backyard pool in Rialto, California on June 17.

The King family has not yet commented on the state of King’s drug use at the time of his death.

Following his beating in 1991, the police involved were found “not guilty” by a jury of their peers, a verdict that led to massive rioting throughout predominately black areas of Los Angeles.

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