Superhero Camp In Kentucky Makes Heroes From Youngsters

Superhero Camp Gives Children The Chance To Be Heroes

A superhero camp in Lexington, Kentucky, has given children the opportunity to become heroes. Camp Curiosity is a six-week program with a one-week “Superhero in Training” theme, according to the Lexington Herald-Leader.

In a recent feature, the news site presented the camp front-and-center as well as some of its happy graduates. One attendee, five-year-old Frank Gooding, told the site that he’d always wanted to be a superhero, specifying that he wanted every “superhero boy power,” but definitely no girl superpowers.

The camp gives kids like Frank a chance to dress up as their favorite heroes — Frank chose Batman — and complete an obstacle course “armed with their cardboard shields and swords,” the site stated.

The course tests the limits of what a three- to five-year-old child can face, featuring small hurdles, tunnels, and a gauntlet of cones complete with flying balls. Children know they’ve reached the end via a large Superman sign.

Frank enjoyed jumping through the hula hoops most of all and declared that he wanted to be a superhero, “because I like to be, and I have two superhero toys.”

Graduates of the superhero camp also get the chance to go on rescue missions to “save” another superhero, played by a camper or teacher, the Herald-Leader noted.

According to Meredith Carrithers, the superhero camp’s director, there are multiple options like this every week, adding that the superhero theme was perhaps the most popular and that the kids “have to stand in their superhero pose and do a pledge each morning.”

For a full look at the experience, we recommend you checking out the whole piece over at the Herald-Leader‘s website.

Camp Curiosity is not the only area in the US that allows children to experience what it’s like to be a superhero. Another superhero camp in Brookhaven, Georgia, teaches children leadership skills, how to develop an action plan, and gives them the opportunity to connect with community political leaders.

Both are reminders of just how powerful the imagination can be in helping children develop, and the idea of the superhero can even be beneficial in helping to fight sickness as seen in a June report from The Inquisitr in which a superhero “superformula” was given to cancer-stricken children to help them fight their diseases.

Are your kids in to comics. Have they ever attended a superhero camp?

[Image via ShutterStock]

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