Posted in: Technology

Google Chrome taking market share from Firefox

googlechromeshare

The immense buzz around Google Chrome, Google’s new browser has started to slow, but the first sets of numbers released show that Google Chrome has a bright future.

Hitwise reports that Google Chrome reach 12th spot in the software category Tuesday, higher that Mozilla, but below Microsoft’s Download Center.

Notably, Hitwise reported that 79% of traffic for Google Chrome came from the front page of Google itself.

There are no solid marketshare figures available from third parties yet, but for visitors to The Inquisitr, the numbers a strong. two weeks prior to launch on the left, visitors since launch on the right.

The figures show next to no drop for Internet Explorer, down only 0.41% post Google Chrome, compared to 4.71% for Firefox and Safari down 2.61%, proving perhaps that Mozilla has the most to fear from Google Chrome.

Some others are reporting a drop in Internet Explorer use, but tend to be more tech oriented blogs as opposed to having a broader reader base, which is something The Inquisitr has more of. It will be interesting to see what other non-tech blogs report in the coming days and weeks.

Update:StatCounter confirms that Firefox is taking a hit.

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3 Responses to “Google Chrome taking market share from Firefox”

  1. Robert

    This is to be expected, Chrome stealing market share from Firefox. You have 2 basic end users, those that will try new technologies and those that will stick to the defaults. In most people's cases (those that stick to the defaults) they are running Windows with IE. It is unlikely that they will change.

    Firefox is generally used by tekkies. They are also more likely to move onto Chrome for at least a while to give it a try. I don't think Chrome will cause IE too many headaches…but Firefox should beware.

  2. christan singles

    The interesting questions to me are not if Chrome (beta) is ready for prime allotment (it is not) or which established browser will suffer more (they all will.) What I find more interesting is that it appears to have all the trappings of a disruptive technology hiding in plain sight and that ultimate techno-ilks don't recognize that because they are caught up in the techie details of this beta release.