Hillary Clinton Nevada campaign investigated for possible campaign violations

Hillary Clinton Campaign Under Investigation For Alleged Election Law Violations [Report]

The Hillary Clinton campaign in Nevada is reportedly under investigation for alleged election law violations.

This development emerged after muckraking journalist/conservative activist James O’Keefe and his Project Veritas crew released another hidden camera video targeting the Democrat front-runner’s field organization.

In the video, Clinton campaign staffers appear to be co-mingling voter registration efforts with simultaneously promoting Hillary Clinton’s candidacy for president which is apparently improper under state election law.

“The video purports to show an undercover Project Veritas journalist recording the campaign staffers discussing how during voter registration drives they openly endorsed Clinton and the Democratic Party. That’s an apparent violation of election law, which prohibits registration workers from advocating for a candidate or a party,” The Daily Caller reported.


Related story: Does This Video Reveal Vote Fraud In The Nevada Caucus?


“Do whatever you can. Whatever you can get away with, just do it,” a Clinton campaign operative allegedly says on the tape.

Other campaign workers in the video seemed to be following a dubious guideline in their voter registration activities summarized as “ask for forgiveness, not for permission.”

An official with the office of the Nevada Secretary of State told Breitbart News yesterday that “We do have an official complaint referencing the video…We will be investigating the complaint.” It remains to be seen, of course, if anything comes of the complaint.

In recent weeks, O’Keefe released two other videos targeting the Clinton campaign. One suggests that Clinton campaign staff in Iowa discourage registering individuals to vote who don’t support Hillary Clinton for president.

“It’s important to note that this video doesn’t show volunteers or paid staff actually violating the law; however, Project Veritas says that all the same, the campaign’s efforts to register only Hillary supporters skirts Iowa election law,” Legal Insurrection observed.

In another, Clinton’s team appears to accept a $75 donation for campaign swag from a Canadian citizen. Federal law prohibits donations to political campaigns from foreign nationals, an encounter which the Clinton campaign “gleefully” brushed off, the Washington Post noted, in part because the Project Veritas undercover journalist was the go-between in the transaction.

Watch the Project Veritas videos embedded below and draw your own conclusions.

Late last month, the Clinton campaign warned its offices across to country to be on alert for any efforts to entrap them on undercover stings video and insisted the campaign is fully compliant with election law, Time reported. A spokesman also blasted the O’Keefe organization for its sketchy track record of ethics.

In a somewhat related story, it was alleged several days ago that the Hillary for president campaign required millennials to sign a “commitment pledge” as a prerequisite for being allowed to attend a campaign event in Cleveland.

Although the controversial O’Keefe has plenty of detractors for his particular brand of journalism, his Project Veritas team, which mostly specializes in undercover videos, has done its share of investigative reporting into corrupt or fraudulent government practices, work which seems to be generally falling out of favor in the mainstream or legacy media. News-gathering organizations used to regularly employ techniques such as hidden camera research in their reportage.

Referencing the often-cozy relationship between Beltway journalists and federal officials, James O’Keefe told the Daily Inter Lake of Montana that “You can’t properly investigate in an aggressive, adversarial manner these people if you are married to them or if you go to all the cocktail parties with them. I think the undercover work is a really important part of democracy because if they are public officials, they need to be scrutinized.”

[Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images News]

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