disqus

Disqus responds to critics: local comment hosting

2.0 commenting service Disqus today launches Disqus 2.0 with a range of new features including local comment hosting.

One of the most common arguments against using Disqus has been the hosted nature of the service, with comments residing on Disqus alone without a local copy. The new Disqus confronts the criticism head on, by offering a new API driven WordPress plugin that stores comments locally as well as on Disqus itself. The feature allows users to try Disqus at any time then leave the service without every having to worry about comment storage. Disqus CEO Daniel Ha tells me that there is has been a great emphasis in the new version of making sure that comments on each blog can be seen by search engines, delivering a completely SEO friendly package.

The new Disqus offers automatic data sync between Disqus and the local database so blogs are never out of date, seamless import/export of old and new comments allowing users to embrace Disqus in full on existing blogs, and the ability to moderate comments from within WordPress itself.

The Disqus site has undergone a large reorganization and redesign to be more intuitive, useful, and accessible. Users now have immediate access to their (and friends) comments to track and manage the discussion.

In the added or improved list includes adding moderators, setting permissions, block lists and comment system configuration.

In an interesting new offering, user profiles can now act as comment blogs. Comments are displayed as blog entries with appropriate context so people can share their contributions on other sites with friends and fans.

Disqus has found strong support in a competitive market that includes Sezwho, Intense Debate and JS-Kit. Disqus is now used on over 30,000 sites, and Ha believes that with the new features and emphasis on a strong API and local data retention that this figure will continue to grow.

The last excuse for you not to try Disqus has just been hit on the head.

Disqus

Comments