Pro Wrestler Dies in Match Due to Cervical Spine Injury

Playing any sport carries a risk of injury. Unfortunately, sometimes those injuries can be fatal. Following Inquisitr‘s report that a pro Mexican wrestler died in match, questions about safety precautions in professional contact sports are beginning to resurface. A cervical spine injury is to blame for the untimely death of Aguayo, which rendered the wrestler immobile while still in the ring.

Perro Aguayo, Jr., son of well-known wrestler Perro Sr., was a championship wrestler with more than two decades of experience. Despite his aptitude, Aguayo suffered a fatal cervical spine injury, which led to cardiac arrest in the ring. Aguayo was pronounced dead on arrival at a Tijuana hospital shortly after the injury occurred, according to New York Daily News.

Director of Mexico’s AAA wrestling federation, Joaquin Roldan, commented on the tragedy via Twitter shortly after news broke that a wrestler died in a match by stating, “I have no words for this terrible news. My sincerest condolences for the Aguayo Ramirez family.” Fans and fellow professional wrestlers throughout the world have united to express feelings of sadness and loss following the news.

The Tijuana Wrestling Commission’s physician Ernesto Franco, who was responsible for treating Aguayo, told local newspapers that multiple attempts to resuscitate Perro Jr. were unsuccessful. Known in the wrestling world as Hijo del Perro Aguayo, Perro Jr. was only 35 years old and leaves behind his father, who was not made aware of his son’s death due to the effect the news might have on his health, Cageside Seats reported.

News that a wrestler dies in match is becoming more common as concerns about the sport’s safety risks continue to arise. For years, the mortality rate of professional wrestlers has been reported to be higher than the public’s, particularly when addiction is a factor. While addiction didn’t appear to be involved in Aguayo’s death, it has played a role in the death of late wrestlers and is a threat that permeates the industry.

In Aguayo’s case, sources close to the situation are calling it an unfortunate accident. However, the American Spine Injury Association (ASIA) has been advocating for improved protection of the spine, particularly for wrestlers and football players, for quite some time. According to ASIA, every 1000 wrestling matches result in 2.5 spinal injuries with more than 90 percent of case outcomes involving paralysis.

Hijo del Perro’s death is a reminder to all professional athletes and adoring fans that what happens in the ring really is dangerous, regardless of whether or not the moves are scripted. Whether a wrestler dies in a match may be tied to improved medical supervision. With increased awareness and safety precautions, medical associations across the globe hope that Aguayo’s death will be the last known instance of a fatal spinal injury in the ring.

[Image from YattaRadio]

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