Albert Einstein Lookalikes Gathering Is Found Worthy Of Guinness Record

Albert Einstein is one of those people who don’t have to be introduced – everybody knows him, irrespective of vocation and level of education. Of the many ways to honor his memory, students of Berkeley Elementary School in California have chosen their own approach – to gather enough people dressed as Albert Einstein in one place to make the event worthy of a Guinness World Record.

According to World Record Academy, they managed to do it by gathering more than 300 Einstein lookalikes in one place.

“Hundreds of elementary school students at Black Pine Circle School, basically the entire student body and anyone else the school could rope in, dressed up as Albert Einstein in an attempt to set a record; a total of 319 Einstein lookalikes were gathered at the record attempt, setting the new world record for the Largest gathering of people dressed as Albert Einstein.”

The number of lookalikes didn’t remain the same throughout the effort, as some of the pupils were disqualified for taking off their fake moustaches or stepping outside the boundary line. However, the previous record being 250, they obviously had more than enough.

Both children and most of the adults, however, had only a vague idea what was the purpose of this entire enterprise, besides the fact that it was all for the sake of a record. The cost of costumes, fake plastic hair, moustaches, and other paraphernalia was all included into the school’s $22,000 annual tuition fee, which also seems like a rather dubious way of spending money that is supposed to pay for education.

This March, Einstein’s name appeared en masse in all kinds of media due to March 6 being the 100th anniversary of his theory of relativity — appropriately enough, on the very same day the Hubble Space Telescope provided several images that apparently confirm the theory, according to the Inquisitr.

“The Hubble Space Telescope provides evidence of the general theory of relativity in its four images of light emanating on different trajectories from an exploding supernova which existed 9.3 billion light years away from Earth. The light is shown to have been distorted by an extensive mass of clustered galaxies nearby and other “missing matter” (or dark matter).”

Something tells us that Albert Einstein himself would probably be more impressed by this than by several hundred preschool kids being forced to dress like him in order to achieve a record.

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