Mars_Curiosity_Rover

Did Mars Curiosity Rover Stumble Upon A Martian? Alien Hunters Seem To Think So

Mars Curiosity rover has been the subject of many outlandish alien theories over the past three years, and the latest ones claim to provide clear photographic evidence of the rover making its first contact with a martian.

And when they say “clear,” they mean heavily pixelated, and when they say “evidence,” they mean you have to squint a little bit to get an image of a cartoonish E.T. Recently, NASA took a photo of Curiosity’s battered wheels, and observers were immediately sympathetic with the rover’s overworked facilities. Some, however, took more interest in what was on the background — a seemingly boring section of rocks at the left side of the image.

If you zoom in a little bit closer, you get to see the rover image below. At the right edge of the mound of rocks, you can somehow see an image of a stereotypical “alien” (encircled for your convenience), resting on the pile and looking at the distance.

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Here is UFO Sightings Daily’s clearer rendition with highlights to make the “martian” look more martian.

Martian

This was first noticed by YouTuber Mars Moon Photo Zoom Club, who elaborates on his observations in the video below:

This isn’t Mars Curiosity rover’s very first “discovery” of alien evidence. Last month, the Inquisitr reported on another hoax detailing how Curiosity allegedly found actual fishbone near the Windjana drilling site. Fact-checker Snopes quickly dismissed the claims, saying that the reputation of the original source of the hoax was questionable, and that images of the “fishbone” discovery were actually just shoddily photoshopped images of real NASA photos of the site.

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Although not as blatant and far-fetched as the examples above, the Curiosity rover is actually getting hints of possible microbial life on Mars. A recent article by the Inquisitr reported on the unusual spikes in methane in the Martian atmosphere, which indicates the possibility of microorganisms producing methane waste products into the air.

Scientists are steering away from more intriguing conclusions, since other causes can account for the sudden rise in methane output on Mars. However, one scientist, Paul Mahaffy, says they are not dismissing the possibility of life on the red planet.

“[And] we certainly should have an open mind. Maybe there are microbes on Mars cranking out methane, but we sure can’t say that with any certainty. It’s just speculation at this point,” said Mahaffy.

The rover celebrated his third Christmas on Mars last Thursday, having landed on the planet on November 2012. Last July, Mars Curiosity rover completed his first Martian year — 687 Earth days. This was also a fruitful year for alien research, after scientists discovered life-friendly lake beds on the red planet this year.

[Image from NASA]

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