Justin Trudeau May Have Accidentally Banned Black Rifle Coffee In Assault Weapon Prohibition

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a press briefing during the United Nations General Assembly at UN headquarters, September 21, 2017 in New York City.
Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Canada‘s Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, appears to have accidentally banned Black Rifle Coffee in a new order that prohibits 1,500 semi-automatic guns.

“Say it ain’t so @JustinTrudeau did you really ban our Fresh Roasted Freedom in Canada eh?” the company tweeted in response to the bill, which bans Black Rifle Company BRC15B in the document of regulations.

“Words cannot espresso how dumb this ban is,” poker player and blogger Tatjana Pasalic wrote in response to the company’s tweet.

Another social media user pointed out that the U.S.-based company “supports the military community and military deployments.”

As reported by Fox Business, Black Rifle Coffee Company (BRCC) was founded by Evan Hafer, who also serves as its CEO. A former U.S. Army Green Beret and CIA contractor, Hafer made a commitment three years ago to hire 10,000 veterans at BRCC.

According to Hafer, veterans are “unparalleled” in their sacrifice, selflessness, resilience, and adaptability, which is why he believes they are an asset to his business.

Trudeau’s recent order immediately banned the sale, import, or transport of many semi-automatic weapons in Canada, Global News reported. The legislation includes a two-year amnesty period for current owners of the guns, and the prime minister claims that a buyback program is on the way.

“All buyback programs will need to be made into bills, and so we will have to work with the other parties, with different groups throughout the country, to make sure that this buyback program [is] the best one, that it be fair, and we want it to have the necessary impact.”

Trudeau’s ban was enacted after Gabriel Wortman killed 22 Nova Scotians — 13 with multiple types of firearms, and nine by fire. The 48-year-old politician also pointed to the 1989 École Polytechnique mass shooting — the perpetrator used a semi-automatic rifle — as a reason for the ban. Before Wortman’s massacre, the École Polytechnique mass shooting, or the Montreal massacre, committed by Marc Lépine was the deadliest in Canada’s history.

In a piece for USA Today, James Alan Fox noted that AR-15s and other similar semi-automatic weapons are typically not used in mass shootings — less than 20 percent, according to research from American nonprofit Everytown for Gun Safety. Nevertheless, Wortman used such a weapon in his massacre, and Fox called Trudeau’s move an “empathetic gesture” to people who have lost loved ones to such weapons.

Critics of Trudeau’s ban note that “assault weapon” is not an official classification, and suggest its vague definition leads to legislative overreach in the form of regulations.